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Rudy goes after Israeli newspaper readers

Like all the candidates in the expanding field of presidential hopefuls, Rudy Giuliani is reaching out supporters, friends, and acquaintances, asking them to help fund what will likely be the costliest election in U.S. history. “America’s mayor” is staking his campaign on counterterrorism and national security issues. And who better to relate to the threat ...

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Like all the candidates in the expanding field of presidential hopefuls, Rudy Giuliani is reaching out supporters, friends, and acquaintances, asking them to help fund what will likely be the costliest election in U.S. history. “America’s mayor” is staking his campaign on counterterrorism and national security issues. And who better to relate to the threat of Islamist extremism than Israel? Which is why “JoinRudy2008.com” donation letters are popping up in the in boxes of readers of the Jerusalem Post:

Dear Friend,

As a longtime friend and staunch supporter of Israel during my entire
public
life, I want to share with you my deep concern for the Jewish state and ask for your support as I campaign to become the next President of the United States….
I promise you that if elected President, I will make sure this country remains on offense against terrorism. But I need your help and support to get there. Will you consider giving $1,000, $500, $250, $100 or $50 to my campaign?…

I stand by Israel and I’ll never embrace a terrorist like Arafat, a tyrant like Ahmadinejad, or a party like Hamas.

Giuliani’s stand against terrorism is commendable. But campaign contributions from foreign nationals are against U.S. elections laws. True, the Jerusalem Post is distributed in the United States as well as in Israel and online, and has many U.S. readers. Yet it seems a bit distasteful to appeal directly to readers of a foreign newspaper—even from a U.S. ally as close as Israel—for money. Put it this way: Imagine the reaction if John Edwards or Barack Obama sent a plea to readers of Le Monde asking for support to strengthen ties between the U.S. and France? I’m guessing it would prompt a bigger outrage than a $400 haircut.

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