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Guinea pigs for China, courtesy of Peru

 I’ll start with the bad news for anyone with a pet guinea pig: this blog post is not about pets. It’s about food staples — the guinea pig being a major one for Peru, with 65 million of the critters eaten each year.  In addition to genetically engineering the perfect pig, Peru celebrates its culinary ...

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NEW YORK, UNITED STATES: "THE JUNGLE BOOK" MEETS "ER" IN NEW YORK CLINIC A guinea pig named "D" is held in front of its X-ray of its head at the Center for Avian & Exotic Medicine, 26 May, 2005, in New York. The center is the only specialist medical facility of its kind in the northeastern US, catering to a large range of exotic animals . AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

 I’ll start with the bad news for anyone with a pet guinea pig: this blog post is not about pets. It’s about food staples — the guinea pig being a major one for Peru, with 65 million of the critters eaten each year.  In addition to genetically engineering the perfect pig, Peru celebrates its culinary tradition in splendid a guinea pig festival.

Alas, despite a bull market at home, exporting the creature has proven difficult in a world where guinea-pigs are at times more associated with cages and hampster wheels than with fine cutlery. But now from the blogosphere a rather brilliant suggestion: export to China.  No qualms about pet vs. platter there. And guinea pigs are remarkably economical — at just $3.20 to feed half a dozen people. Sounds like guinea pigs are a recession proof (even countercyclical) market. I’m investing now.

Hat tip: Double Handshake

STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images

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