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Worst Place for the World’s Children: Afghanistan

Where is the worst place for children to be born in 2009, especially girls? Surprise! Afghanistan. Today, UNICEF published a special report titled State of the World’s Children; Daniel Toole, UNICEF regional director for South Asia, told a news briefing in Geneva earlier today:  Afghanistan today is without a doubt the most dangerous place to ...

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KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 6: Gulseema,5, holds her shovel working at the Sadat Ltd. brick factory on November 6, 2009 in Kabul, Afghanistan. Child labor is common at the brick factories where the parents work as laborers, desperate to make more money enlisting their children to help doing the easy jobs. Brick factories are an economical, business that is still thriving. The land used is dry and barren which is perfect for the making of bricks providing work almost year round. A few years ago all factories changed from wood to coal causing further problems with pollution, the factories have been pushed out of the city limits because of this issue. Workers can make an average of $200.00 to $300 per month. For 1,000 bricks the factory will get about $45.00 Workers can make an average of $200.00 to $300 per month. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)

Where is the worst place for children to be born in 2009, especially girls? Surprise! Afghanistan. Today, UNICEF published a special report titled State of the World’s Children; Daniel Toole, UNICEF regional director for South Asia, told a news briefing in Geneva earlier today: 

Afghanistan today is without a doubt the most dangerous place to be born.

After eight years since the U.S. invasion, this is just one more incentive to encouarge the Obama administration to make a decision on its role in the region.

More optimistically, the reports highlights signatory countries of the UN’s Convention on the Rights of the Child who have shown marked improvement, including India, Serbia and Sierra Leone.

Paula Bronstein/Getty Images

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