The Oil and the Glory

The Weekly Wrap: October 22, 2010

The rare earths imbroglio continues. The New York Times’ Keith Bradsher has another report on the slowdown of rare-earth exports from China: This time, he wrote, the flow of the strategic elements has slowed to not just the United States but also Europe. The Obama Administration ordered an investigation into the report. Two weeks before ...

The rare earths imbroglio continues. The New York Times’ Keith Bradsher has another report on the slowdown of rare-earth exports from China: This time, he wrote, the flow of the strategic elements has slowed to not just the United States but also Europe. The Obama Administration ordered an investigation into the report. Two weeks before the U.S. mid-term elections — in which the dastardly Chinese are already emerging as a popular bogeyman — the elements are likely to come up as a political issue.

Sanctions tighten on Iran. The United States succeeded in further tightening oil sanctions on Iran this week, when Japan’s Inpex said it would join European companies and halt its relationship with Tehran, which Washington is attempting to push to the negotiating table over its nuclear development program. (The Iranian government, meanwhile, played down Inpex’s announced withdrawal from development of the Azadegan natural gas field.) That now leaves China as the last major country with significant energy investments in Iran, John Pomfret reported in The Washington Post.

Did Britain just institute a carbon tax? Earlier this year, Britain’s Department of Energy and Climate Change launched a carbon emissions reduction policy that would have levied a pollution charge — about $22 per ton of carbon — on Britain’s 4,000 biggest energy users, then paid the money back to the same companies in the form of energy efficiency incentives. It was a revenue-neutral approach — until Wednesday, when the government quietly decided to keep the money, on the order of $1.58 billion a year. David Roberts at Grist explains.

China braces for a flood of LNG. If you want to gauge how much liquefied natural gas a country plans on using in the coming years, look to the shipyards. Case in point: The Chinese shipbuilding company that has built all of China’s LNG tankers to date is ramping up its tanker construction efforts in preparation for what it anticipates will be a quadrupling of LNG imports between now and 2015, one of the company’s top executives told Bloomberg News on Thursday. China’s LNG consumption, if it lives up to the current projections, will have ramifications far beyond the country’s shores — just ask the companies building pipelines in Alaska.

Another $1.5 billion for biofuels in the United States. After the collapse of efforts to pass cap-and-trade legislation and hopes fading for even more modest renewable energy legislation, these are not the best of times for the clean energy industry in Washington — unless, of course, you’re in the biofuels business. Reuters reports that the U.S. Department of Agriculture is throwing another $1.5 billion at the industry in an effort to meet congressionally mandated targets for the production of still-commercially-unproven advanced biofuels by 2022. As for the 54-cents-a-gallon tariff on imported ethanol — a reliable source of teeth-grinding for Brazil’s government and sugar cane industry — Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack says it’s probably sticking around, though it’s likely to be phased out in the future. File that in the "I’ll believe it when I see it" folder.

Chevron drills deeper. Well, that didn’t take long — barely a week after the Obama administration lifted its moratorium on deepwater drilling in the Gulf of Mexico, Chevron announced Thursday that it would develop two fields in the Gulf estimated to contain some 500 million barrels of oil. The project is pegged at $7.5 billion, and would involve drilling wells deeper than BP’s ill-fated Macondo operation. "In the end, the United States needs the oil and gas and other countries need the oil and gas, and some of the best places to explore are deepwater environments," Bobby Ryan, Chevron’s vice president for global operations, told the New York Times‘ Clifford Krauss.

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