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Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, December 22, 2014

Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, December 22, 2014

Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, December 22, 2014
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Iyad el-Baghdadi argues that it’s a mistake to frame Middle Eastern politics as a choice between Islamism and dictatorship.
Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez explains why the U.S.-Cuban rapprochement is a cold shower for Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro.
Berivan Orucoglu looks at the split among Turkish journalists.
Hanna Hindstrom reports on the consequences of the failure to address war crimes committed during half a century of Burmese military rule.
Mohamed Eljarh writes on the rise of human rights abuses amid Libya’s deepening civil war.
Mark Green warns that Tunisia’s young people are increasingly alienated from the political process.
(The photo above shows children looking at a nativity scene in a refugee camp on the grounds of St. Elias Church in Erbil, northern Iraq.)
And now for this week’s recommended reads:
David Bornstein of The New York Times speculates on the origins of moral courage.
In a new article for Democratization, Francis Fukuyama examines the relationship between liberal democracy and the state.
International Crisis Group warns that Tunisian reformers now face the task of overcoming political divides in the wake of Sunday’s presidential runoff.
Foreign Policy’s David Kenner looks at a controversial new report that maps out a possible solution to the Syrian civil war.
Danny Postel of In These Times moderates a conversation on leftist objections to U.S. intervention in Syria. Writing for UNHCR Tracks, Lauren Bohn covers the Syrian Kurdish refugees who are putting down roots in Turkey.
In World Politics Review, Thanassis Cambanis examines the frustration of young people in Egypt after the restoration of authoritarian rule. Democracy Digest reports on the Egyptian government’s peculiar refusal to allow entry to a well-known American expert.
And finally, Public Radio International’s The World tells the story of Tunisian prostitutes who want to get back to work.

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