Argument

Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, February 29, 2016

 To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.  Alina Polyakova makes the case that Europe is right to fear Putin’s support for extremist political parties. Katya Gorchinskaya explains why her independent news organization decided to tell the story of a man who killed for the Euromaidan revolution. Andreas ...

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 To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. 

Alina Polyakova makes the case that Europe is right to fear Putin’s support for extremist political parties.

Katya Gorchinskaya explains why her independent news organization decided to tell the story of a man who killed for the Euromaidan revolution.

Andreas Umland shows why much of the blame for Ukraine’s stalled reform efforts can be laid at the feet of Vladimir Putin.

Mattia Toaldo argues that the West needs to develop a political strategy if it hopes to defeat the Islamic State in Libya.

Michael Cecire looks at how the shooting of a prominent opposition leader is likely to affect Georgia’s overheated political environment.

And finally, Christine Nalyaaka describes why she was determined to vote in Uganda’s election, no matter how flawed.

And now for this week’s recommended reads:

The New York Times presents a detailed two-part investigation of the United States’ intervention in Libya by Jo Becker and Scott Shane. Ben Fishman argues in Politico Magazine that the intervention wasn’t doomed from the start — and what can still be done to save the country.

Writing for the Carnegie Middle East Center, Sharan Grewal details how the relationship between Tunisia’s military and its civilian government has changed — and improved — since the revolution.

Democracy Lab contributor Hanna Hindstrom reports for the Diplomat that Burma’s military is being implicated in cyber attacks against pro-democracy media outlets.

The Guardian offers stories from readers around the world on how they’ve experienced authoritarian crackdowns on their counties’ civil societies. Also for the Guardian, Chris Michael interviews two architects, Rem Koolhaas and Kunlé Adeyemi, about their efforts to understand the chaotic Nigerian city of Lagos.

For the Global Anticorruption Blog, Katie King covers the surprising admission of responsibility from South African President Jacob Zuma for a corruption scandal that has dogged his administration.

For the Atlantic Council’s “New Atlanticist” blog, Agnia Grigas describes how Russia’s policy of granting Russian citizenship to ethnic Russians in neighboring countries paves the way for its territorial ambitions.

And in the Harvard Crimson, Sacha Yabili criticizes the university for inviting Rwandan president Paul Kagame to speak.

In the photo, Libyans celebrate the fifth anniversary of the Libyan revolution in the city of Benghazi, the 2011 uprising’s birthplace, on February 17, 2016.

Photo credit: ABDULLAH DOMA/AFP/Getty Images

Ilya Lozovsky is assistant editor of Democracy Lab. Prior to joining Foreign Policy, he worked as program officer for Eurasia at Freedom House, providing emergency support to human rights activists and organizations across that continent. @ichbinilya

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