Argument

Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, March 14, 2016

To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Min Zin paints a portrait of who’s who in the new Burma as Aung San Suu Kyi pulls the strings. Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez lays the blame for Venezuela’s deadly shortage of medicine on President Nicolás Maduro. Dalibor Rohac explains why the ...

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To keep up with Democracy Lab in real time, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Min Zin paints a portrait of who’s who in the new Burma as Aung San Suu Kyi pulls the strings.

Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez lays the blame for Venezuela’s deadly shortage of medicine on President Nicolás Maduro.

Dalibor Rohac explains why the West is no longer a positive model for Eastern Europe’s democracies.

Alina Polyakova lays out what Slovakia’s election of a neo-Nazi party into its parliament says about the European far right.

Eszter Zalan shows us why the European Union is unable to hold its own members accountable to basic democratic standards.

And Christian Caryl explains why Donald Trump’s proposal to ban Muslims from the United States is the world’s dumbest idea.

And now for this week’s recommended reads:

As Burma’s opposition party assumes power, The Guardian’s Nick Davies revisits the horrors of its military dictatorship — and worries about the generals’ continuing power.

In the Financial Times, Edward Luce warns that pessimism and loss of faith in government is causing a profound “stress test” for liberal democracy.

The Guardian’s Jonathan Watts reports on massive anti-government protests that have shaken Brazil over the weekend. Antonio Sampaio of the International Institute for Strategic Studies underscores the extent to which the Petrobras corruption scandal has undermined the government. And Michael Smith and Sabrina Valle of Bloomberg Businessweek ask if it’s game over for President Dilma Rousseff as investigators close in.

Sylvia Kauffmann notes in the New York Times that it was too soon to declare Europe’s newest eastern democracies fully integrated in the EU. 

At the Conversation, John Keane responds to Flemish historian David Van Reybrouck’s recent argument that elections have outlived their usefulness.

In the Washington Post’s “Monkey Cage” blog, Neil Abrams and M. Steven Fish argue that any country interested in establishing rule of law must first purge corrupt bureaucrats and end subsidies.

In Foreign Policy, James Stavridis suggests that a partition of Syria is no longer unthinkable.

Melissa Hooper and Grigory Frolov of The Free Russia Foundation examine Russia’s efforts to export its authoritarian model around the world.

The Electoral Integrity Project releases its “The Year in Elections 2015” report, which evaluates the quality of elections held around the world last year.

And finally, if you’re in Washington D.C. on April 4, check out photographer Greg Constantine’s discussion of his book about statelessness, Nowhere People.

In the photo, Brazilians protesters demand President Dilma Rousseff’s resignation on March 13, 2016 at the Esplanada dos Ministerios in Brasilia.

Photo credit: ANDRESSA ANHOLETE/AFP/Getty Images

Ilya Lozovsky is assistant editor of Democracy Lab. Prior to joining Foreign Policy, he worked as program officer for Eurasia at Freedom House, providing emergency support to human rights activists and organizations across that continent. @ichbinilya

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