Best Defense

Our military is busy, but not always in a good way: reliefs, ousters, and scandals

Navy Rear Adm. Robert Gilbeau made history by being the first admiral ever to be convicted of a federal crime while on active duty.

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— Navy Rear Adm. Robert Gilbeau made history by being the first admiral ever to be convicted of a federal crime while on active duty. He got 18 months for lying to investigators of the “Fat Leonard” scandal.

 In a throwback to pre-criminal reliefs, the Navy threw overboard the skipper and executive officer of the USS Anchorage for messing up the ship’s propulsion system.

— Your U.S. Navy’s been busy. Big old love triangle among senior chiefs erupted aboard the USS Hue City.

— An Air Force colonel in Florida was ensnared by an undercover operation in which a police officer pretended online to be a 14-year-old boy.

— An Air Force command master chief sergeant who was the top Naval command officer at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base (Also known as “the Boneyard”) got a raft-load of charges thrown at him. Dereliction of duty, false statements, and obstruction of justice lead the way.

— An Army staff sergeant at Fort Jackson, S.C. was charged with animal abuse after authorities found a score of dead animals in his apartment, including a dog, some snakes, two snapping turtles, and a bearded dragon.

— A West Pointer named Jacob Whisenhut was charged with sexual assault of a female cadet and got 21 years. What I can’t figure out: Will he be dismissed from the Army before or after he does his time at Leavenworth?

Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons

Thomas E. Ricks covered the U.S. military from 1991 to 2008 for the Wall Street Journal and then the Washington Post. He can be reached at ricksblogcomment@gmail.com.

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