Podcast

Is U.S. Immigration Policy Worse Than It’s Ever Been?

Suketu Mehta and Becca Heller talk President Trump, the real economy of immigration, and getting trolled by Ann Coulter.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel greets US President Donald Trump  prior to the start of the first working session of the G20 meeting in Hamburg, northern Germany, on July 7.
Leaders of the world's top economies will gather from July 7 to 8, 2017 in Germany for likely the stormiest G20 summit in years, with disagreements ranging from wars to climate change and global trade. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / IAN LANGSDON        (Photo credit should read IAN LANGSDON/AFP/Getty Images)
German Chancellor Angela Merkel greets US President Donald Trump prior to the start of the first working session of the G20 meeting in Hamburg, northern Germany, on July 7. Leaders of the world's top economies will gather from July 7 to 8, 2017 in Germany for likely the stormiest G20 summit in years, with disagreements ranging from wars to climate change and global trade. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / IAN LANGSDON (Photo credit should read IAN LANGSDON/AFP/Getty Images)

As fear over the influx of refugees has risen across Europe and the United States, millions of displaced people are in limbo while governments implement more restrictive immigration policies and grapple with the economic and humanitarian costs of welcoming migrants into their countries. In Foreign Policy’s latest print edition, author Suketu Mehta not only challenges the West’s fear of migrants but also argues that it is this fear that destroys democracy in his provocative essay “This Land Is Their Land.” And in this issue’s Final Word piece “What a Just Immigration Policy Doesn’t Look Like,” Becca Heller sounds off on the Trump administration’s travel ban and why immigration policy can’t be expressed in a tweet.

On this week’s second episode of The E.R., contributors Suketu and Becca join FP’s Rebecca Frankel and Keith Johnson to discuss their pieces in the September/October 2017 print edition of Foreign Policy. The panel dissects arguments commonly used to advocate closing borders including economic strain and the dilution of shared culture and language. Is there any truth behind these arguments? And who benefits from stoking fear of immigrants and refugees?

Suketu Mehta is the New York-based author of Maximum City: Bombay Lost and Found and an associate professor of journalism at New York University. He is currently working on a nonfiction book about immigrants in contemporary New York. Follow him on Twitter: @suketumehta.

Becca Heller is the director and co-founder of the International Refugee Assistance Project, a visiting clinical lecturer in law at Yale Law School, and a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Keith Johnson is FP’s deputy editor for news. Follow him on Twitter: @KFJ_FP.

Rebecca Frankel is the executive editor of Foreign Policy’s print magazine. She is the author of War Dogs: Tales of Canine Heroism, History, and Love, a New York Times bestselling book about canines in combat. Follow her on Twitter: @becksfrankel.

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Rebecca Frankel is the executive editor of Foreign Policy’s print magazine. She is the author of War Dogs: Tales of Canine Heroism, History, and Love, a New York Times bestselling book about canines in combat. She has appeared as a guest on Conan, BBC World News, and the Diane Rehm Show, among others. In 2016, she adopted Dyngo, a military working dog who is now happily retired from his bomb-sniffing career in the Air Force. @becksfrankel

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