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STRALSUND, GERMANY - SEPTEMBER 16:  A vandalized billboard showing German Chancellor and Christian Democrat (CDU) Angela Merkel stands on September 16, 2017 Stralsund, Germany. Merkel is seeking a fourth term in federal elections scheduled for September 24. She currently holds an approximate 16-point lead over her main rival, German Social Democrat (SPD) Martin Schulz. Both the German Greens Party and the Free Democrats (FDP) are hoping to position themselves to be part of the next coalition government. The right-wing, populist Alternative for Germany (AfD) will likely finish above the 5% election votes minimum and hence win seats in the Bundestag.  (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

The Dam Will Hold. Until It Doesn’t.

Europe has managed to slow the flow of migrants, at least for now — but is undermining its most-cherished values in the process.

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Nearly There, but Never Further Away

Europe has outsourced the dirty work of border control to Libyan militias. In doing so, it has turned African migrants into commodities to be captured, sold, and traded like slaves.

LAMPEDUSA, ITALY - MAY 19: A man is helped off a small rubber boat by crew members from NGO Sea-Eye on May 19, 2017 in international waters off the coast of Libya.  (Photo by Christian Marquardt/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

The Savior’s Dilemma

Are naval search-and-rescue operations saving migrants’ lives — or just encouraging them to take greater risks?

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All for Nothing

Migrants who fail to reach Europe face humiliation, isolation, and impoverishment at home.

AGADEZ, Niger - Adji, driver. Adji has a wife a two children, and also cares for his deceased brother's eight children. He says the EU policy has made it too risky for him to continue driving as his family cannot survive if he were to be arrested. He has not found other work though, and his family is struggling to buy their daily rice.

A historical smuggling hub through which as many as 13,000 migrants passed each month in 2016, Agadez has been the site of a recent crackdown on human smugglers after the EU struck a $635 million deal with Nigerian authorities to keep a lid on migration. (Photo by Nichole Sobecki)

My Smuggler, My Savior

They’re migrants’ only chance of making it safely across the Sahara. They’re also outlaws engaged in a deadly game of cat and mouse with Niger’s military.

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The Deported

Europe is expelling thousands of Africans. To one Malian deportee, that looks like a recipe for revolution.

BAMAKO, Mali - Portrait of Abdoulaye Traoré from the rooftop of his university in Bamako, the capital of Mali. After work at the cashew processing plant stalled Abdoulaye left his hometown to begin studying law, but his family has remained in Kolondieba. 

The cashew processing plant where Abdoulaye Traoré and roughly 200 other Malian laborers made a living by stripping the fleshy husks off of crescent-shaped nuts had been sitting idle since early February when the plant ran out of raw materials. The plant is one of Mali’s flagship development projects, and the blueprint for future multi-million-euro job-creation initiatives aimed at curbing migration to Europe. (Photo by Nichole Sobecki)

The Paradox of Prosperity

Europe is spending billions of dollars to jump-start Africa’s poorest economies. But that may just accelerate the exodus.

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Highway Through Hell

The human-smuggling route across the Sahara may have been the deadliest on Earth. Then the EU paid Niger’s army to shut it down — and made it even more treacherous.

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Mali’s Migrant Crackdown

Europe has been helping fight the country’s jihadis for years. Now it’s turning its sights on human smugglers.

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Europe Slams Its Gates: Imperiling Africa – And Its Own Soul

An unprecedented wave of African migration is warping Europe’s politics and threatening its stability. Can the Continent respond without destroying its values and wreaking havoc in Africa? FP’s special investigation examines Europe’s desperate campaign to barricade itself — and the policies’ unintended consequences.

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This Land Is Their Land

Immigration is inevitable. When will the West learn that it promises salvation — not destruction?

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On the Edge of Afghanistan

A decimated economy, a resurgent Taliban, and growing tensions with Iran are driving disenchanted Afghans to seek opportunities abroad. And for many it’s their only option.

Kasim Muhammed Tahir and his pet bird Abboud

The Things They Carried: The Iraqis Who Fled Mosul

Escaping war and the Islamic State, families took with them what little they could carry — remembrances of loved ones and the past.

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Rescuing Migrants From a Couch in Galicia

How a school administrator in Spain is helping save refugees with little more than fervor and a phone.

Kaveh Adel was born in Ahvaz and raised in Tehran. He is a dentist, cartoonist, author, coach and speaker who emigrated to the USA in 1986 at the height of Iran-Iraq war fleeing political persecution in Iran.  Currently he lives and practices in Illinois where he is writing an autobiographical graphic novel.

The Iranians Who Can’t (or Won’t) Go Home Again

After years of living in America, those who fled political turmoil in Iran reflect on a complicated relationship with their homeland.

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Global Thinkers 2015 Issue Cover