Democracy Lab

About Democracy Lab

Democracy Lab is Foreign Policy's home for coverage of transitions to democracy, published in partnership with the Legatum Institute. Democracy Lab also runs Transitions, a blog featuring on-the-ground coverage of transitioning countries.

Editor, Christian Caryl
Assistant Editor, Ilya Lozovsky

Learn more about Democracy Lab here.

People in Tehran check their mobile phones as they wait in the streets after an earthquake near Iranian capital on Dec. 21, 2017. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Iran’s Ban of Messaging App Hurts Economy at Pivotal Moment

Rights group says app was widely used by businesses and even government offices.

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan walks down the stairs in between soldiers, wearing traditional army uniforms from the Ottoman Empire, as he arrives for a welcoming ceremony for Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas at the presidential palace in Ankara, January 12, 2015.

Don’t Turn The Turkish Army Into A Political Tool

Turkey has a history of coups. Whoever wins the election must prevent politicization of the military.

Russian security officers stand guard at the Fan Fest zone in Nizhny Novgorod, one of the host cities of the Russia 2018 World Cup football tournament, on June 19, 2018. (DIMITAR DILKOFF/AFP/Getty Images)

Russia’s World Cup Isn’t as Safe as It Looks

The Kremlin has prepared for the soccer tournament by cracking down on terror threats — the wrong kind.

A cargo ship at a port in Qingdao, China on March 8. (AFP/Getty Images)

Trump’s Trade Wars Prompt Congressional Pushback

As the U.S. trade war with China escalates, a growing number of GOP lawmakers want final say on tariffs.

View of supporters of Mexican presidential candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, during a campaign rally in Texcoco, state of Mexico. (Alfredo Estrella/AFP)

Get Ready for a Mexican Left Turn on Foreign Policy

If populism sweeps to power in Mexico, the country's foreign policy will return to the 1930s.

Fans cheer for Mexico during an international friendly soccer match against Croatia at AT&T Stadium on March 27, 2018 in Arlington, Texas.

If Trump Tears Up NAFTA, Sports Will Keep North America Together

The joint 2026 World Cup is yet another sign that Canada, Mexico, and the United States are becoming increasingly culturally and economically interdependent.

Galleries

Bangladeshis cram onto a train as they travel home to be with their families ahead of the Muslim festival of Eid al-Fitr in Dhaka on June 14. Eid marks the end of the holy fasting month of Ramadan. MUNIR UZ ZAMAN/AFP/Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Travelers in Bangladesh, nuns in Guatemala, and urban sheep in France.

A man representing the devil jumps over babies during “El salto del Colacho” — “the devil’s jump” — in the village of Castrillo de Murcia, Spain, on June 3. Baby-jumping is a traditional Spanish practice dating back to 1620 that takes place annually to celebrate the Catholic feast of Corpus Christi. CESAR MANSO/AFP/Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Baby-jumpers in Spain, a vigil in Hong Kong, and astronauts in Kazakstan.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

Foto, Michael Melo

The Right to Kill

Should Brazil keep its Amazon tribes from taking the lives of their children?

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Germany’s Family Feud

Family reunification for refugees is no longer a given. But keeping relatives apart hurts host countries as well as newcomers.

Thus Spoke Jordan Peterson

The best-selling psychologist isn't leading young men to salvation — he's delivering them to authoritarianism.

The Arab World’s Star Student

What Tunisia can teach its neighbors about the value of education.