Peace Channel

About Peace Channel

A partnership between Foreign Policy and the U.S. Institute of Peace, the Peace Channel is FP’s home for cutting-edge analysis and reporting on international conflict prevention and resolution. The Peace Channel’s authors examine what’s driving the world’s most vexing challenges and explore new ways to resolve the conflicts that threaten lives, livelihoods, and human dignity.

Hafiz Muhammad Saeed, head of Jamaat-ud-Dawa (JuD) addresses demonstrators on Kashmir Solidarity day in Lahore on February 5, 2015. (Arif Ali/AFP/Getty Images)

Pakistan Is Inviting Its Favorite Jihadis Into Parliament

It might seem like the Pakistani military is trying to defang its ostensible adversaries. It's really trying to empower them.

WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 10:  U.S. President Barack Obama speaks while meeting with President-elect Donald Trump (L) following a meeting in the Oval Office November 10, 2016 in Washington, DC. Trump is scheduled to meet with members of the Republican leadership in Congress later today on Capitol Hill.  (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

The Myth of a ‘Better’ Iran Deal

The Obama administration didn’t botch negotiations with Tehran. And Trump isn’t going to be able to get something tougher.

US President Donald Trump listen as Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (out of frame) speaks at Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort in Palm Beach, Florida, on February 11, 2017, after North Korea reportedly fired a ballistic missile, the first since Donald Trump became US president. / AFP / Nicholas Kamm        (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Needs a Diplomatic Surge for North Korea

The White House’s policy of maximum pressure is having precisely the wrong effect.

COX'S BAZAR, BANGLADESH - SEPTEMBER 19: Refugees are seen in the Falungkhali Rohingya refugee camp on September 19, 2017 in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. Over 400,000 Rohingya refugees have fled into Bangladesh since late August during the outbreak of violence in the Rakhine state as Myanmar's de facto leader Aung San Suu Kyi broke her silence on the Rohingya crisis on Tuesday and defended the security forces while criticism on her handling of the Rohingya crisis grows. Recent satellite images released by Amnesty International provided evidence that security forces were trying to push the minority Muslim group out of the country. (Photo by Allison Joyce/Getty Images)

The World Knew Ahead of Time the Rohingya Were Facing Genocide

We've never known more about oncoming atrocities, but are still mostly helpless to stop them.

President of the Democratic Republic of Congo Joseph Kabila looks on during a meeting with South African President Jacob Zuma at Sefako Makgatho Presidential Guest House in Pretoria on June 25, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / Phill Magakoe        (Photo credit should read PHILL MAGAKOE/AFP/Getty Images)

The Jig Is Up for Congo’s Embattled President

Instead of giving President Joseph Kabila a free pass to cling to power, world leaders should endorse a plan to replace him.

Damascus, SYRIA: A Syrian man arranges a display of national flags carrying a portrait of President Bashar al-Assad in a shop in Damascus, 26 May 2007. Assad stands tomorrow in a no-contest poll which will give him another seven years leading a regional heavyweight under immense international pressure. With parliament unanimously approving the candidature of the 41-year-old president for a second term, and with vocal opponents of the regime locked up, the referendum will inevitably anoint Assad as president until the year 2014. AFP PHOTO/HASSAN AMMAR (Photo credit should read HASSAN AMMAR/AFP/Getty Images)

Syrians Are Ready to Accept Bashar al-Assad as President

The war-weary country isn’t enthusiastic about its president, but desperate for a return to normalcy.

TOPSHOT - A man looks at smoke rising from buildings following a strike on a rebel-held area of the Jobar district, east of the Syrian capital on September 14, 2017.  / AFP PHOTO / ABDULMONAM EASSA        (Photo credit should read ABDULMONAM EASSA/AFP/Getty Images)

It’s Time For a New Syria Peace Process

The United States could decide to keep up the charade in Geneva, but if we want to see greater stability in the years ahead, we need to change course.

The Latest

A U.S. soldier in Baghdad, Iraq on Oct. 25, 2009. (Muhannad Fala'ah/Getty Images)

Israel Is Growing Increasingly Worried About the Trump Administration

As Iran, Saudi Arabia, and Russia rush to fill the vacuum of leadership in the Middle East, the United States is AWOL.

A deactivated Titan II  nuclear missile in Green Valley, Arizona on May 12, 2015. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

President Trump and the Risks of Nuclear War

How command and control works when the military wakes up the president vs. when the president wakes up the military.

The Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. (Wikimedia Commons)

Babylon Revisited: Melancholy Thoughts After a Short Trip to Washington, D.C.

As a young reporter in political Washington in the late 1980s, I noticed that there was a type of person who thrived in the driven, transactional environment of the capital.

Secretary of Defense James Mattis talks with South Korean Defense Minister Song Young-moo in the Demilitarized Zone on October 27. (Jeon Heon-Kyun-Pool/Getty Images)

SitRep: Pentagon Officials Open To Talks With North Korea

U.S. taking eye off South China Sea, Navy searching for way to 355 ships, Pentagon experimenting with new missile defenses

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

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This Land Is Their Land

Immigration is inevitable. When will the West learn that it promises salvation — not destruction?

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Rescuing Migrants From a Couch in Galicia

How a school administrator in Spain is helping save refugees with little more than fervor and a phone.

On the Edge of Afghanistan

A decimated economy, a resurgent Taliban, and growing tensions with Iran are driving disenchanted Afghans to seek opportunities abroad. And for many it’s their only option.

Highway Through Hell

The human-smuggling route across the Sahara may have been the deadliest on Earth. Then the EU paid Niger’s army to shut it down — and made it even more treacherous.

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Global Thinkers 2015 Issue Cover