Shadow Gov’t

About Shadow Government

Shadow Government is a blog about U.S. foreign policy in the age of Trump, written by experienced policymakers, scholars, and practitioners from the loyal Democrat opposition. It is co-edited by Derek Chollet, Colin Kahl, and Julie Smith.

Meet the contributors 

Singaporean Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, right, greats North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Singapore on June 10. (Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images)

Here’s How the Trump-Kim Summit Could Play Out

No one knows for sure what will happen in Singapore. These are some of the possibilities.

U.S. President Donald Trump waves from the door of Air Force One upon arrival in Singapore on June 10. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

This Is What North Korea Sanctions Relief Should Look Like

If North Korea agrees to denuclearize, here's how Trump should go about rolling back sanctions.

Myanmar State Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi in Naypyidaw, Myanmar's capital, on May 22. (That Aung/AFP/Getty Images)

Myanmar’s Atrocities Demand New Sanctions

Rep. Eliot Engel’s sanctions legislation offers the right response to the Myanmar military’s campaign of murder and displacement.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks at the Heritage Foundation in Washington on May 21. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Pompeo’s Iran Plan Is a Pipe Dream

The Trump team doesn’t have a post-nuke deal strategy — just a list of demands.

U.S. President Donald Trump reinstates sanctions on Iran, after announcing his decision to withdraw the United States from the 2015 Iran nuclear deal, at the White House on May 8. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Leaving the Iran Nuclear Deal Will Have Unintended Consequences

Trump's actions may ultimately weaken the strength of sanctions as a tool of U.S. statecraft.

Galleries

Bangladeshis cram onto a train as they travel home to be with their families ahead of the Muslim festival of Eid al-Fitr in Dhaka on June 14. Eid marks the end of the holy fasting month of Ramadan. MUNIR UZ ZAMAN/AFP/Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Travelers in Bangladesh, nuns in Guatemala, and urban sheep in France.

A man representing the devil jumps over babies during “El salto del Colacho” — “the devil’s jump” — in the village of Castrillo de Murcia, Spain, on June 3. Baby-jumping is a traditional Spanish practice dating back to 1620 that takes place annually to celebrate the Catholic feast of Corpus Christi. CESAR MANSO/AFP/Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Baby-jumpers in Spain, a vigil in Hong Kong, and astronauts in Kazakstan.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

Foto, Michael Melo

The Right to Kill

Should Brazil keep its Amazon tribes from taking the lives of their children?

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Germany’s Family Feud

Family reunification for refugees is no longer a given. But keeping relatives apart hurts host countries as well as newcomers.

Thus Spoke Jordan Peterson

The best-selling psychologist isn't leading young men to salvation — he's delivering them to authoritarianism.

The Arab World’s Star Student

What Tunisia can teach its neighbors about the value of education.