Brazil

Foto, Michael Melo

Reporter’s Notebook: Brazil’s Forgotten Children and Russia’s #MeToo Problem

FP’s April magazine: “The End of Human Rights” tackled issues from the Amazon to Vladivostok. On today’s E.R. episode, we talk to two contributors.

Former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva gestures to supporters at the headquarters of the Metalworkers' Union on April 7, 2018 in the Sao Bernardo do Campo section of Sao Paulo, Brazil after a warrant for his arrest was issued. The  former president told the crowd "I will comply with their warrant."

Lula Lost, But Brazil’s Democracy Has Won

By going to jail, the former president signaled his respect for the rule of law.

Foto, Michael Melo

The Right to Kill

Should Brazil keep its Amazon tribes from taking the lives of their children?

The now-missing ARA San Juan submarine in Buenos Aires on May 23, 2014. (Alejandro Moritz/AFP/Getty Images)

Five Questions About the Missing Argentine Submarine

Despite a large international search effort, time is running out for the crew.

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One Woman’s Fight to Claim Her ‘Blackness’ in Brazil

The experience of a young lawyer raises difficult questions about race, belonging, and the bureaucracy of affirmative action in a country lauded for its egalitarian history.

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Os vários tons de Maíra Mutti Araújo

Num país famoso por um ideal de mistura racial, a luta de uma candidata para usar cotas raciais levanta questões complexas sobre cor e identidade no Brasil.

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Brazil Has Become a Gangland

With the country’s politics plagued by scandal and corruption, Brazil’s gangs are fighting a deadly and brazen turf war — inside and out of the broken prison system.

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Protesters Storm Government Ministries in Brazil

But President Michel Temer still isn’t stepping down.

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Yet Another Presidential Corruption Scandal in Brazil

Forget the U.S. presidential scandal. Brazil is pillorying its second president in two years, both on allegations of corruption.

BRASILIA, BRAZIL - JUNE 27: Members of group Educafro protest in silence in front of the Presidential Palace on favor of the racial quota policies on June 27, 2012 in Brasilia, Brazil. (Photo by Peter Francia/News Free/LatinContent/Getty Images)

Brazil’s New Problem With Blackness

As the proudly mixed-race country grapples with its legacy of slavery, affirmative-action race tribunals are measuring skull shape and nose width to determine who counts as disadvantaged.

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Deadly Yellow Fever Outbreak in Brazil Sparks Fears of Zika-Like Epidemic

Brazilian authorities work to prevent history from repeating itself.

RECIFE, BRAZIL - DECEMBER 12:  Juan Pedro, who has microcephaly and turned 1 year old on December 4, is held by his godmother Sinthia on December 12, 2016 in Recife, Brazil. As many of the babies with microcephaly, believed to be linked to the Zika virus, turn 1 year old in Recife, doctors and mothers are adapting and learning treatments to assist and calm the children. Many of the children are suffering a plethora of difficulties including vision and hearing problems with doctors now labeling the overall condition as "congenital Zika syndrome." Authorities have recorded thousands of cases in Brazil in which the mosquito-borne Zika virus may have led to microcephaly in infants. Microcephaly results in an abnormally small head in newborns and is associated with various disorders. The state with the most cases is Pernambuco, whose capital is Recife, and is being called the epicenter of the outbreak.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Condemned to Life in Zikaland

In Recife, Brazil’s ground zero of the Zika virus, a community struggles to deal with the devastating spread of microcephaly.

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In Brazil, a Corruption Case Begins as Economy Still Struggles

Is the trial against Brazil's former president a balm for or distraction from the country's current economic woes?

TOPSHOT - People protest against Brazil's interim president Michel Temer during the Rio 2016 Olympic Games women's football quarterfinal match between Canada and France at the Corinthians Arena in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on August 12, 2016. / AFP / Miguel SCHINCARIOL        (Photo credit should read MIGUEL SCHINCARIOL/AFP/Getty Images)

Political Pranks in Brazil Put Starbucks in an Awkward Position

During a charged summer, Brazilians used Starbucks to express their political frustrations.

Supporters of Brazilian suspended President Dilma Rousseff follow the Senate's session as it votes on stripping her of the presidency in a traumatic impeachment trial, on a screen at Planalto Palace in Brasilia on August 31, 2016.
Rousseff, from the leftist Workers' Party, is accused of taking illegal state loans to patch budget holes in 2014, masking the country's problems as it slid into its deepest recession in decades. / AFP / EVARISTO SA        (Photo credit should read EVARISTO SA/AFP/Getty Images)

Rousseff’s Impeachment Met With Tears — Even from One of Her Impeachers

The Brazilian president was impeached after a 10-month battle to keep her role.

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