Erdogan

Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yildirim in Ankara on Oct. 31. (Adem Altan/AFP/Getty Images)

The Trump Administration Can’t Give Turkey a Hall Pass on Rule of Law

Turkey wants to play “hostage diplomacy” with the United States. But the risks of transactional politics have far-reaching consequences.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan speaks during a ceremony marking the last year's failed coup, at the Bestepe People's Culture and Congress Centre in Ankara, on July 13, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / ADEM ALTAN        (Photo credit should read ADEM ALTAN/AFP/Getty Images)

First, They Came for the Gulenists

Erdogan isn’t the root of Turkey’s troubles. It’s a deep-seated cycle of repression and revenge — with no end in sight.

TOPSHOT - EDITORS NOTE: Graphic content / Turkish anti riot police officers escort Turkish soldiers who allegedly took part in a military coup as they are leaving the courthouse at Bakirkoy district in Istanbul on July 16, 2016. 
President Recep Tayyip Erdogan battled to regain control over Turkey on July 16, 2016 after a coup that claimed more than 250 lives, bid by discontented soldiers, as signs grew that the most serious challenge to his 13 years of dominant rule was faltering. / AFP / OZAN KOSE        (Photo credit should read OZAN KOSE/AFP/Getty Images)

Turkey’s Post-Coup Purge and Erdogan’s Private Army

The Turkish president has brutally cleansed ranks and is building a new army with some strange bedfellows.

Performers wearing masks of (L-R) German Chancellor Angela Merkel, French President Emmanuel Macron and US President Donald Trump hold a placard reading: "Better off equal! close the gap between rich and poor" during a demonstration called by several NGOs ahead of the G20 summit in Hamburg on July 2, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / John MACDOUGALL        (Photo credit should read JOHN MACDOUGALL/AFP/Getty Images)

Thousands of Protesters Prepare to Jeer Trump, Putin, and Erdogan at G-20 Summit

German chancellor Angela Merkel reportedly chose Hamburg to show how protests are tolerated in democracies.

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Turkey Angry at U.S. For Stopping Erdogan’s Goons From Beating Up D.C. Protesters

In the latest chapter of a new diplomatic rift between Washington and Ankara.

TOPSHOT - Pro-Erdogan supporters react during a protest at the Sarchane park in Istanbul on July 19, 2016. 
The Turkish army said on July 19 that the vast majority of its members had no links with the July 15 attempted coup and warned that the putschists would face severe punishment. The armed forces blamed the "Fethullah Terrorist Organisation" (FETO) for the failed putsch, referring to Fethullah Gulen, a one-time ally turned foe of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Turkey's prime minister said on July 19 his government had sent four files to the United States, as Ankara seeks the extradition of US-based preacher Fethullah Gulen. / AFP / ARIS MESSINIS        (Photo credit should read ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images)

The United States Should Extradite Fetullah Gülen

It is clear to the government of Turkey that the Pennsylvania cleric is a coup plotter. Donald Trump should honor our request to bring him to justice.

ANKARA, TURKEY - APRIL 17: Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan gives a referendum victory speech to his supporters at the Presidential Palace on April 17, 2017 in Ankara Turkey. Erdogan declared victory in Sunday's historic referendum that will grant sweeping powers to the presidency, hailing the result as a "historic decision. 51.4 per cent per cent of voters had sided with the "Yes" campaign, ushering in the most radical change to the country's political system in modern times.Turkey's main opposition calls on top election board to annul the referendum. OSCE observers said that a Turkish electoral board decision to allow as valid ballots that did not bear official stamps undermined important safeguards against fraud. (Photo by Elif Sogut/Getty Images)

Trump and Erdogan Need to Discuss Some Hard Truths

Trump should use his political capital to address the thorny Kurdish issue, but Europe, authoritarianism, and extradition requests are also on the table.

KOBANE, SYRIA - JUNE 20: (TURKEY OUT) A Kurdish People's Protection Units, or YPG fighters sit near a check point in the outskirts of the destroyed Syrian town of Kobane, also known as Ain al-Arab, Syria. June 20, 2015. Kurdish fighters with the YPG took full control of Kobane and strategic city of Tal Abyad, dealing a major blow to the Islamic State group's ability to wage war in Syria. Mopping up operations have started to make the town safe for the return of residents from Turkey, after more than a year of Islamic State militants holding control of the town. (Photo by Ahmet Sik/Getty Images)

Trump to Tell Turkey: We’re Going to Take Raqqa With the Kurds

The White House is poised to greenlight an Obama administration plan to seize the last bastion of the Islamic State in Syria.

Meral Aksener, candidate for the leadership of the Turkish opposition party Nationalist Movement Party (MHP), delivers a speech during a "NO" campaign meeting on April 8, 2017, in Ankara, a week ahead of a constitutional referendum.  
On April 16, 2017, the Turkish public will vote on whether to change the current parliamentary system into an executive presidency.  / AFP PHOTO / ADEM ALTAN        (Photo credit should read ADEM ALTAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Can the ‘She-Wolf’ Who Rejected the Harem Take On Sultan Erdogan?

The feisty, nationalist grandmother Meral Aksener is a real threat to unseat Turkey’s demagogic president. If he doesn’t toss her in jail first.

ANKARA, TURKEY - APRIL 17: Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan gives a referendum victory speech to his supporters at the Presidential Palace on April 17, 2017 in Ankara Turkey. Erdogan declared victory in Sunday's historic referendum that will grant sweeping powers to the presidency, hailing the result as a "historic decision. 51.4 per cent per cent of voters had sided with the "Yes" campaign, ushering in the most radical change to the country's political system in modern times.Turkey's main opposition calls on top election board to annul the referendum. OSCE observers said that a Turkish electoral board decision to allow as valid ballots that did not bear official stamps undermined important safeguards against fraud. (Photo by Elif Sogut/Getty Images)

It’s Time for Erdogan to Admit He’s Not a Democrat

Coming out as an authoritarian might be the best thing for Turkey's relationship with the United States — and his own legacy.

Supporters of the "yes" wave Turkish National flags and flags depicting Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan as they cheer during his speech at the Presidential Palace in Ankara, on April 17, 2017 following the results in a nationwide referendum that will determine Turkey's future destiny.
Erdogan on April 17 said Turkey could hold a referendum on its long-stalled EU membership bid after Turks voted to approve expanding the president's powers in a plebiscite. Narrowly won by President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the referendum asked voters to boost the powers of the Turkish head of state -- a move that rights watchdogs have said could fatally weaken democracy in the linchpin country. / AFP PHOTO / ADEM ALTAN        (Photo credit should read ADEM ALTAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Here’s What Erdogan’s Referendum Means for Turkey, the EU, and the U.S.

It is far too early to assess the aftermath, but here’s what to watch for in the weeks ahead.

Supporters of the "yes" wave Turkish national flags and scarfs picturing Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan during a rally in front of the president residence, at Sariyer district, in Istanbul, on April 16, 2017, after the initial results of a nationwide referendum that will determine Turkey's future destiny.
The "Yes" campaign to give Turkish President expanded powers was just ahead in a tightly-contested referendum but the 'No' was closing the gap, according to initial results. / AFP PHOTO / Bulent Kilic        (Photo credit should read BULENT KILIC/AFP/Getty Images)

RIP Turkey, 1921 – 2017

Recep Tayyip Erdogan didn’t just win his constitutional referendum — he permanently closed a chapter of his country’s modern history.

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Is Turkey Still a Democracy?

An upcoming referendum and a vicious war of words with Europe could end up making Erdogan more powerful — and isolated — than ever.

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Global Thinkers 2015 Issue Cover