European Union

German Chancellor Angela Merkel departs in the early morning after preliminary coalition talks collapsed.  (Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Germany Has Plunged Into Unprecedented Political Chaos

It’s going to be a while before Europe’s most powerful country has a stable government – and Angela Merkel probably won't be leading it.

Cambodian police officials patrol during a hearing at the Supreme Court in Phnom Penh on Nov. 16. (Tang Chhin Sothy/AFP/Getty Images)

Cambodia Becomes the World’s Newest One-Party State

With Chinese support, Hun Sen has effectively destroyed all opposition to his autocratic rule.

Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz and Heinz-Christian Strache, chairman of the Freedom Party, give a joint press conference in Vienna on Oct. 25. (Helmut Fohringer/AFP/Getty Images)

The Battle for Austria’s Right Is a Harbinger for the Rest of Europe

In Vienna, the center-right and populist right are vying for power. All of Europe is watching.

Sebastian Kurz visiting the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial museum in Jerusalem during his tenure as foreign minister. (Gali Tibbon/AFP/Getty Images)

Meet the First Millennial to Run a Western Country

Nobody knows if 31-year-old Sebastian Kurz is an establishment conservative or a far-right populist — and that’s why he’ll soon be running Austria.

Supporters of an independence for Catalonia listen to Catalan president Carles Puigdemont's speech  in Barcelona on October 10, 2017. ( Pau Barrena/AFP/Getty Images)

Catalan President Backs Down From Independence Declaration

Puigdemont says he’ll still pursue negotiations with Spain.

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Who’s Afraid of George Soros?

How an octogenarian businessman became the bogeyman of Europe.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel greets US President Donald Trump  prior to the start of the first working session of the G20 meeting in Hamburg, northern Germany, on July 7.
Leaders of the world's top economies will gather from July 7 to 8, 2017 in Germany for likely the stormiest G20 summit in years, with disagreements ranging from wars to climate change and global trade. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / IAN LANGSDON        (Photo credit should read IAN LANGSDON/AFP/Getty Images)

Europe Slams Its Gates (Part Two)

Are the moral consequences of Europe’s increasingly hardline policy on African immigration outweighed by the political imperatives?

STRALSUND, GERMANY - SEPTEMBER 16:  A vandalized billboard showing German Chancellor and Christian Democrat (CDU) Angela Merkel stands on September 16, 2017 Stralsund, Germany. Merkel is seeking a fourth term in federal elections scheduled for September 24. She currently holds an approximate 16-point lead over her main rival, German Social Democrat (SPD) Martin Schulz. Both the German Greens Party and the Free Democrats (FDP) are hoping to position themselves to be part of the next coalition government. The right-wing, populist Alternative for Germany (AfD) will likely finish above the 5% election votes minimum and hence win seats in the Bundestag.  (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

The Dam Will Hold. Until It Doesn’t.

Europe has managed to slow the flow of migrants, at least for now — but is undermining its most-cherished values in the process.

Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy on February 24, 2015. (PIERRE-PHILIPPE MARCOU/AFP/Getty Images)

The Ghost of Franco Still Haunts Catalonia

Mariano Rajoy’s use of violence against separatists wasn’t an aberration. It was an authentic expression of Spanish conservatism.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel greets US President Donald Trump  prior to the start of the first working session of the G20 meeting in Hamburg, northern Germany, on July 7.
Leaders of the world's top economies will gather from July 7 to 8, 2017 in Germany for likely the stormiest G20 summit in years, with disagreements ranging from wars to climate change and global trade. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / IAN LANGSDON        (Photo credit should read IAN LANGSDON/AFP/Getty Images)

Europe Slams Its Gates (Part One)

European aid intended to combat African migration may just be making the problem worse.

AGADEZ, Niger - Adji, driver. Adji has a wife a two children, and also cares for his deceased brother's eight children. He says the EU policy has made it too risky for him to continue driving as his family cannot survive if he were to be arrested. He has not found other work though, and his family is struggling to buy their daily rice.

A historical smuggling hub through which as many as 13,000 migrants passed each month in 2016, Agadez has been the site of a recent crackdown on human smugglers after the EU struck a $635 million deal with Nigerian authorities to keep a lid on migration. (Photo by Nichole Sobecki)

My Smuggler, My Savior

They’re migrants’ only chance of making it safely across the Sahara. They’re also outlaws engaged in a deadly game of cat and mouse with Niger’s military.

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Highway Through Hell

The human-smuggling route across the Sahara may have been the deadliest on Earth. Then the EU paid Niger’s army to shut it down — and made it even more treacherous.

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Mali’s Migrant Crackdown

Europe has been helping fight the country’s jihadis for years. Now it’s turning its sights on human smugglers.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel attends a press conference at the headquarters of the Christian Democratic Union (CDU) party in Berlin on September 25, 2017, one day after general elections.
Merkel woke up to a fourth term but now faces the double headache of an emboldened hard-right opposition party and thorny coalition talks ahead. / AFP PHOTO / Tobias SCHWARZ / ALTERNATIVE CROP         (Photo credit should read TOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/Getty Images)

This Was the Worst Possible German Election for Europe

Angela Merkel’s final term was supposed to revive the EU. Now it might condemn the continent to permanent crisis.

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Global Thinkers 2015 Issue Cover