Germany

Soldiers from the Foreign Legion march down the Champs Elysees, with the Arc de Triomphe in the background,  in Paris during a rehearsal of the annual Bastille Day military parade on July 10, 2017. (Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images)

Army Service Could Be the Answer to Europe’s Integration Problem

The EU’s defense forces are struggling to recruit, and immigrants are often eager to serve.

Vara_2

Reporter’s Notebook: Germany’s Family Reunification Problem

FP contributor Vauhini Vara appears on The E.R. to discuss her story “Germany’s Family Feud.”

German Chancellor Angela Merkel with Ukraine’s President Petro Poroshenko, in Berlin, Apr. 10, 2018. (Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images)

Is Germany Souring on Russia’s Nord Stream?

Merkel now talks of protecting Ukraine’s interests as Russia’s $12 billion gas pipeline seeks to bypass Kiev.

A scene from "Babylon Berlin," now streaming on Netflix. (Beta Film)

German TV Is Sanitizing History

A new wave of historical dramas is telling the wrong stories about the country’s past.

Swastika adorned flags carried at a Nazi Rally in Germany, 1934. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)

An Obscure Magazine From 1934 Predicted the Nazi Genocide

What a long-lost magazine teaches us about demagoguery and our response to it.

Vara_1

Germany’s Family Feud

Family reunification for refugees is no longer a given. But keeping relatives apart hurts host countries as well as newcomers.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel walks past sailors of the German Navy while visiting the "Braunschweig" warship on January 19, 2016 in Kiel, Germany.

Merkel’s Military Revival

Germany is poised to become Europe’s first line of defense, but facing down a revanchist Russia will require more spending and better coordination among NATO allies.

A visitor at the entrance of the memorial site of the former Nazi concentration camp Auschwitz-Birkenau in Oswiecim, Poland, on Jan. 25, 2015. (Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images)

Poland’s Misunderstood Holocaust Law

My government wants to ban accusations of Polish wartime complicity for the sake of honoring history.

Andrea Nahles and Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer in Berlin, on March 12, 2018. (JOHN MACDOUGALL/AFP/Getty Images)

Germany’s Post-Merkel Power Fraus

The German chancellor's most likely successors are both women — but the similarities end there.

Jens Weidmann presents at the Bundesbank on May 2, 2011 in Frankfurt, Germany. (Alex Grimm/Getty Images)

The Most Dangerous Man in Europe Is Jens Weidmann

The front-runner to lead Europe’s central bank doesn't seem to believe in central banking.

Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich introduces Donald Trump during a rally in Cincinnati, Ohio. (John Sommers II/Getty Images)

Democracy Is Dying by Natural Causes

From Nazis to Newt Gingrich, a brief survey of the many ways government-by-the-people can perish from the earth.

The cruise ship Costa Concordia off the Italian island of Giglio, on Jan. 14, 2012. (Laura Lezza/Getty Images)

Italy’s Election Is a Shipwreck

Italians are rearranging the deck chairs as their country irrevocably sinks.

Jean-Claude Juncker, president of the European Commission delivers a speech at the 2018 Munich Security Conference on Feb. 17, in Munich, Germany. (Sebastian Widmann/Getty Images)

Spy Chiefs Descend on Munich Confab in Record Numbers

An annual security gathering in Munich has become the new hot spot for top intelligence officials meeting in the shadows of a public event.

Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif and his German counterpart, Sigmar Gabriel, speak to the media following talks in Berlin on June 27, 2017. (Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Europe’s Sanctions-Blocking Threats Are Empty

When it comes to Iran sanctions, the EU must satisfy Trump’s demands. Access to the U.S. financial system hangs in the balance.

Adolf Hitler marches into the arena at the opening ceremony of the 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin. (E. E. Williams/Keystone/Getty Images)

The Olympics on The E.R.: What Can We Learn From Past Games Ahead of Pyeongchang?

In part one of our two-part Olympics series, print editor Sarah Wildman calls up two historians to ask what we can learn from past games ahead of the kick off in South Korea on February 9.

Load 10 More Articles