Global Warming

UN Secretary-General-designate Antonio Guterres speaks during the ceremony for the appointment of the Secretary-General during the 70th session of the General Assembly October 13, 2016 at the United Nations in New York.
The UN General Assembly on Thursday formally appointed Antonio Guterres as the new secretary-general of the United Nations, replacing Ban Ki-moon. The 193 member states adopted by acclamation a resolution appointing the former prime minister of Portugal for a five-year term beginning January 1.
 / AFP / Jewel SAMAD        (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)

Before U.N. Summit, World Tells Trump His ‘America-First Fun’ Must End

Friends and rivals alike press administration to embrace multilateral diplomacy on climate change, Iran, and North Korea.

Surrounded by miners from Rosebud Mining, US President Donald Trump (C) applauds after signing the Energy Independence Executive Order at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Headquarters in Washington, DC, March 28, 2017.
President Donald Trump claimed an end to the "war on coal" Tuesday, as he moved to roll back climate protections enacted by predecessor Barack Obama. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON        (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

Is the Paris Climate Agreement Dead?

Trump’s new enviro-rollback seeks to undermine the landmark accord, but an America First energy plan might not mean pulling out entirely.

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Climate Change Is Mauling the Arctic Worse Than We Even Thought

NOAA’s Arctic Report Card documents melting sea ice and a ticking time bomb of billions of tons of carbon.

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Kerry’s March to the Penguins

Why Secretary Kerry is Stopping in Antarctica Before Next Week’s Trip to Morocco for the U.N. Climate Change Summit

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The Green Movement and its Inconvenient Truths

2015 Global Thinker Marjan Minnesma and Gasland director Josh Fox debate the best—and perhaps only—way to spurn action on climate change: Terrify people.

A portrait of Sk. Aptauddin and he's destroyed house by sea water. 

Photograph from the series " The story of a dead horse". 
Photo of Jordi Pizarro © 

**Do not use this photograph with permission by photographer Jordi Pizarro. © all rights reserved. 2015

STORY: 

Ghoramara is the name of a Island, in bengalí language Ghoramara minds "a dead horse" long time ago there were Bengali tigers in the island. They say that one of them killed the horse of a British settler and that it is the discovery of the animal's dead body what gave the place its name.

In only four decades Ghoramara has lost more than 75 percent of its territory. Erosion and sea rising due to climate change are responsible for such a loss. While expert look for scientific explanations, the island's five thousand inhabitants strive to protect what is left and get prepared for the worst.  It is a race against time with little tools and expertise, done more with the heart than with preparedness in an effort to save their way of life in one of the world's ecosystems most vulnerable to climate change. A struggle that won't be probably mentioned in next December UN climate change summit, although recent reports warn that the island is likely to disappear within the next six  to eight years.

Waiting to Vanish

As their land disappears into the sea, villagers in the Bay of Bengal struggle to keep their livelihoods.

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Is God Having a Climate Moment?

Atmospheric scientist Katharine Hayhoe and activist Bill McKibben discuss the pope, global warming, and the making of faith-based environmentalism.

Feng Li/Getty Images

One Cheer for the Climate Deal

The landmark deal won’t cut China’s emissions for more than a decade, and it’s going to be tough for the U.S. to meet its requirements. But it's a good start.

PATRIK STOLLARZ/AFP/Getty Images

Germany’s Revolution in Small Batch, Artisanal Energy

The industrial engine of Europe is increasingly powered by backyard windmills and locally owned solar panels. And this complex, patchwork system just might be the future of sustainable energy.

Alexander Hassenstein/Getty Images

The Peat Monster

Finland's pristine environment has been ruined, activists say, by an out-of-control energy giant -- turning once pristine lakes into brown pools teeming with "monkey disease."

Photo via Flickr - SaskPower

Saskatchewan Rough Ride

Canada scores first in the clean-coal game. But it will be a tough and expensive act to follow.

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Global Thinkers 2015 Issue Cover