nuclear

A deactivated Titan II  nuclear missile in Green Valley, Arizona on May 12, 2015. (Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images)

President Trump and the Risks of Nuclear War

How command and control works when the military wakes up the president vs. when the president wakes up the military.

A military aide carries the "nuclear football" on the South Lawn of the White House on April 25 in Washington, DC. (Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images)

Congress Questions Trump’s Exclusive Hold on the Nuclear Football

In an extraordinary hearing, lawmakers plan to review presidential powers to launch a nuclear strike.

A nuclear danger sign near the Belarusian village of Dronki. (Viktor Drachev/AFP/Getty Images)

Lithuania, Leery of Moscow, Spars With Belarus Over Nuclear Reactor

Fearing the Kremlin’s grand design, and another nuclear disaster, Vilnius has turned a power plant into a battleground.

Senator Bob Corker speaks to the press on Sep. 9, 2015. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Corker and Cotton’s False Promises Would Push Iran Toward Nuclearization

The Republican senators want to keep the JCPOA while adding new restrictions. It won’t work.

People watch a news report in Seoul on North Korea's first hydrogen bomb test on Jan. 6, 2016. (Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images)

The Trump Administration Has No Plan for Dealing With a North Korean EMP Attack

Newt Gingrich says there’s a lack of staff in the administration to take on the issue. Critics say it doesn't matter.

President Donald Trump takes questions from reporters at the White House on Oct. 13. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Donald Trump Needs a Good Cop on Iran

The U.S. president has the biggest bully pulpit. But Europe has all the leverage.

This picture from North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) released on Aug. 30 shows North Korea's intermediate-range strategic ballistic rocket Hwasong-12 lifting off at an undisclosed location near Pyongyang. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Your Apocalyptic Fantasies Aren’t Helping the North Korea Crisis

Stop speculating about nuclear war, and start asking these six questions about the Trump administration’s policies toward Pyongyang.

(From L) World Council of Churches (WCC) spokeswoman Marianne Ejdersten, Nuclear disarmament group International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) executive director Beatrice Fihn, ICAN coordinator Daniel Hogstan and ICAN member of the steering committee Grethe Ostern attend a press conference after ICAN won the Nobel Peace Prize for its decade-long campaign to rid the world of the atomic bomb on October 6, 2017 in Geneva. (Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images)

An Award for the Collapse of Nuclear Disarmament

ICAN isn’t the Nobel Peace Prize winner that policymakers wanted, but it’s the one they deserve.

(From L) Nuclear disarmament group ICAN coordinator Daniel Hogstan, executive director Beatrice Fihn and her husband Will Fihn Ramsay pose with a banner bearing the group's logo after ICAN won the Nobel Peace Prize for its decade-long campaign to rid the world of the atomic bomb as nuclear-fuelled crises swirl over North Korea and Iran, on October 6, 2017 in Geneva.
With the nuclear threat at its most acute in decades, the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, which on October 6 won the Nobel Peace Prize, is urgently pressing to consign the bomb to history. / AFP PHOTO / Fabrice COFFRINI        (Photo credit should read FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images)

Nobel Peace Prize Win a Boon for Nuclear Nonproliferation Activists

Experts say it will drive the conversation about a world without nuclear weapons, but don’t expect a nuclear-free world just yet.

President Donald Trump looks on during a meeting in October. / Douliery-Pool / Getty Images

Trump to Chart Hawkish Course on Iran

By telling Congress the nuclear deal is not in the U.S. interest, the White House is gambling on European help to roll back Iranian influence.

The X-51A Waverider is a hypersonic vehicle designed to ride on its own shockwave and travel at speeds of up to Mach 6.

Report: Hypersonic Missiles Could Trigger a War

With these new weapons, countries might become “trigger-happy.”

WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 10:  U.S. President Barack Obama speaks while meeting with President-elect Donald Trump (L) following a meeting in the Oval Office November 10, 2016 in Washington, DC. Trump is scheduled to meet with members of the Republican leadership in Congress later today on Capitol Hill.  (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

The Myth of a ‘Better’ Iran Deal

The Obama administration didn’t botch negotiations with Tehran. And Trump isn’t going to be able to get something tougher.

TOPSHOT - ADDITION-
People watch a news report on North Korea's first hydrogen bomb test at a railroad station in Seoul on January 6, 2016. South Korea "strongly" condemned North Korea's shock hydrogen bomb test and vowed to take "all necessary measures" to penalise its nuclear-armed neighbour.  The image shown on TV shows files images from other nuclear tests from other countries and the caption in red at the bottom of the screen reads "the Blue House will convene an emergency meeting of the NSC, the National Security Council."   AFP PHOTO / JUNG YEON-JE / AFP / JUNG YEON-JE        (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)

California Is Already Preparing for a North Korean Nuclear Attack

Beware of radioactive pets, and don’t expect the feds to show up anytime soon.

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Global Thinkers 2015 Issue Cover