Nukes

Iranians hold posters condemning the United States, Israel, and Saudi Arabia at the funeral of the victims of terror attacks on Tehran's parliament complex and the shrine of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini on June 9. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Rogue Iran Is a Global Threat

Donald Trump is right to put Tehran on notice. But the nuclear deal is just the tip of the iceberg.

North (top) and South (bottom) Korean border posts on Aug. 21, 2015. (Jung Yeon-je/AFP/Getty Images)

Seven Reasons Why Putting U.S. Nukes Back in South Korea Is a Terrible Idea

Here are seven reasons why the United States should not seek to deploy nuclear weapons in the Korean Peninsula.

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Trump’s Top General Says Iran Honoring Nuke Deal

Dunford, the head of the Joint Chiefs, warns that unilaterally pulling out would anger allies and complicate the North Korea crisis.

WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 10:  U.S. President Barack Obama speaks while meeting with President-elect Donald Trump (L) following a meeting in the Oval Office November 10, 2016 in Washington, DC. Trump is scheduled to meet with members of the Republican leadership in Congress later today on Capitol Hill.  (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

The Myth of a ‘Better’ Iran Deal

The Obama administration didn’t botch negotiations with Tehran. And Trump isn’t going to be able to get something tougher.

South Korean soldiers stand guard at a guard post near the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) dividing two Koreas in the border city of Paju on August 11, 2017.
As nuclear-armed North Korea's missile stand-off with the US escalates, calls are mounting in the South for Seoul to build nuclear weapons of its own to defend itself -- which would complicate the situation even further. / AFP PHOTO / JUNG Yeon-Je        (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)

The United States Should Talk to North Korea

Trump needs to focus on reassuring U.S. allies, engage with North Korea, and stop doing Pyongyang favors.

Chinese President Xi Jinping speaks during the Dialogue of Emerging Market and Developing Countries on the sidelines of the 2017 BRICS Summit in Xiamen, southeastern China's Fujian Province on September 5, 2017.
Xi opened the annual summit of BRICS leaders that already has been upstaged by North Korea's latest nuclear weapons provocation. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / WU HONG        (Photo credit should read WU HONG/AFP/Getty Images)

A Nuclear Slap in China’s Face

Kim Jong Un has caused Xi Jinping to lose face. What will China do about it?

SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA - SEPTEMBER 03:  Officers of the Korea Meteorological Administration watch TV news reporting on a possible nuclear test conducted by North Korea at the Korea Meteorological Administration center on September 3, 2017 in Seoul, South Korea. South Korea, Japan and the U.S. detected an artificial earthquake from Kilju in the northern Hamgyong Province of North Korea. The Japanese government has confirmed they believe it was North Korea's sixth nuclear test.  (Photo by Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images)

North Korean Nuclear Test Spites Both Washington and Beijing

The blast was deliberately timed as a slap in the face for Donald Trump — and perhaps for Xi Jinping too.

GOTEMBA, JAPAN - AUGUST 24:  A Japan Ground Self-Defense Force (JGSDF) Type 74 battle tank fires ammunition during a live-fire exercise at the foot of Mount Fuji in the Hataoka district of the East Fuji Maneuver Area  on August 24, 2017 in Gotemba, Shizuoka, Japan. The four-day annual live-fire drill takes place amid rising tensions between North Korean and United States.  (Photo by Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images)

Japan’s Empty Menu of Options to Stop North Korea

Hawkish Prime Minister Shinzo Abe seems to have few choices save strong words of condemnation for the Kim regime’s missile tests. But he’s working the long game.

This picture from North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) taken on July 3, 2017 and released on July 4, 2017 shows North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un signing the order to carry out the test-fire of the intercontinental ballistic missile Hwasong-14 at an undisclosed location.
North Korea declared on July 4 it had successfully tested its first intercontinental ballistic missile -- a watershed moment in its push to develop a nuclear weapon capable of hitting the mainland United States. / AFP PHOTO / KCNA VIA KNS / STR / South Korea OUT / REPUBLIC OF KOREA OUT   ---EDITORS NOTE--- RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE - MANDATORY CREDIT "AFP PHOTO/KCNA VIA KNS" - NO MARKETING NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS - DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS
THIS PICTURE WAS MADE AVAILABLE BY A THIRD PARTY. AFP CAN NOT INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THE AUTHENTICITY, LOCATION, DATE AND CONTENT OF THIS IMAGE. THIS PHOTO IS DISTRIBUTED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY AFP. 
 /         (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump’s Nuclear Crisis Was of His Own Making

The showdown between Washington and Pyongyang was the president's invention.

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Iran Is Not About to Fall for Trump’s Trap

President Hassan Rouhani is positioning himself to be the next supreme leader — and he isn't going to let U.S. threats to blow up the nuclear deal get in his way.

WASHINGTON, DC - AUGUST 17:  Secretary of State Rex Tillerson (2ndR), Defense Secretary James Mattis (R), shake hands with Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono (2ndL) and Defense Minister Itsunori Onodera (L), during a meeting of the U.S.-Japan Security Consultative Committee at the State Department, on August 17, 2017 in Washington, DC.  (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Tokyo and Washington Have Another Nuclear Problem

There’s a plutonium arms race brewing in East Asia that could see China, Japan, and South Korea with the capability to make tens of thousands of nuclear weapons.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel greets US President Donald Trump  prior to the start of the first working session of the G20 meeting in Hamburg, northern Germany, on July 7.
Leaders of the world's top economies will gather from July 7 to 8, 2017 in Germany for likely the stormiest G20 summit in years, with disagreements ranging from wars to climate change and global trade. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / IAN LANGSDON        (Photo credit should read IAN LANGSDON/AFP/Getty Images)

Are We Going to War with North Korea?

The rhetorical battle of words is at an all-time high. Here’s how the real shooting could break out.

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Global Thinkers 2015 Issue Cover