Oil

Above: Two people look over the balcony on the second floor of the Parliament building in Georgetown on April 26. Top: In a section of Georgetown called Houston, contractors are building out a new oil industry depot, capable of storing needed equipment, fuel, water, cement, fluids, and other materials that contractors working in Guyana’s deep waters need. The base already has a contract to supply ExxonMobil. (Micah Maidenberg for Foreign Policy)

The Country That Wasn’t Ready to Win the Lottery

Guyana just discovered it owns enough oil to solve all its problems — and cause even bigger ones.

An Ethiopian U.N. peacekeeper patrols the Amiet Market in Abyei. The market has become the largest trading hub in the region and a symbol of peace between the Misseriya nomads from Sudan and the Ngok Dinka from South Sudan. Local leaders use the market to resolve issues of conflict and are working together to bring stability to the area, which has been contested for more than ten years.

Conflict in Abyei Could Reignite South Sudan’s Civil War

If the U.N. withdraws peacekeepers from a long-contested oil-rich enclave, it's likely to spark further fighting in an already unstable region.

Teenagers from a boxing school take part in a training session in the Caspian Sea near Soviet oil rigs in the Azerbaijani capital Baku on June 27, 2015. (KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images)

Why the West Needs Azerbaijan

There is only one way for vital Asian oil and gas resources to reach Europe without passing through Russia and Iran: through the narrow “Ganja Gap.”

Iran's Bushehr nuclear power plant on Aug. 21, 2010. (IIPA via Getty Images)

In the Middle East, Soon Everyone Will Want the Bomb

The region is at risk of a nuclear arms race. Washington needs to stop proliferation before it starts.

Chinese President Xi Jinping and Russian President Vladimir Putin at the West Lake State Guest House on Sept. 4, 2016 in Hangzhou, China. (Wang Zhou - Pool/Getty Images)

China Has Decided Russia Is Too Risky an Investment

The economics of a major oil deal seemed to make sense. But when energy companies are arms of the state, economics aren't the only factor.

U.S. President Donald Trump and Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari arrive for a joint press conference in the Rose Garden of the White House on April 30, 2018.

An Arms Deal Won’t Heal What Ails Muhammadu Buhari

Nigeria’s president is trying to prove he can get from Washington what his predecessor couldn’t, but it might not be enough to get him re-elected.

Donald Trump at a rally May 5, 2016 in Charleston, West Virginia. (BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump’s Iran Policy Is Blowing Up His Energy Agenda

The U.S. president wanted to be energy independent, but he’s forcing his country to get more deeply involved in the global oil market.

Donald Trump speaks at a rally organized by the Tea Party Patriots against the Iran nuclear deal while campaigning for president in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 9, 2015.  (Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)

What Happens if the U.S. Bows Out of the Iran Nuclear Deal?

By reimposing sanctions, Trump risks alienating Europe and freeing Iran to revive its nuclear program.

A member of the national guard fires his shotgun at opposition demonstrators during clashes in Caracas on July 28, 2017. (Carlos Becerra/AFP/Getty Images)

The Perils of a Putsch in Venezuela

Encouraging a coup in Caracas will give Russia and China a foothold in the United States’ backyard.

Saudi Energy Minister Khalid al-Falih, left, and Russian Energy Minister Alexander Novak attend a meeting between OPEC and non-OPEC members in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, on April 20. (Amer Hilabi/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Is Right to Target Saudi-Russian Collusion

Moscow and Riyadh are conspiring to rig global oil markets against the United States.

Russian President Vladimir Putin welcomes Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev ahead of an informal Commonwealth of Independent States leaders summit at the Novo-Ogaryovo state residence outside Moscow on Dec. 26, 2017. (Alexey Druzhinin/AFP/Getty Images)

Azerbaijan’s Election Is a Farce

The United States should be condemning Ilham Aliyev’s corrupt regime rather than condoning it.

Chinese President Xi Jinping shakes hand with Czech President Milos Zeman in Prague on March 29, 2016. (Michal Cizek/AFP/Getty Images)

Prague Opened the Door to Chinese Influence. Now It May Need to Change Course.

The fall of a shadowy Chinese oil magnate may bring a reckoning to cozy Czech-Chinese relations.

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman on March 7, 2018 in London, England. (Leon Neal/Getty Images)

Mohammed bin Salman Isn’t Wonky Enough

Saudi Arabia’s crown prince knows his country needs an economic overhaul, but his plans don’t add up.

A Pakistani currency dealer counts Chinese currency at his shop in Quetta on Jan. 3, 2018. (Banaras Khan/AFP/Getty)

China’s Bid to Upend the Global Oil Market

Could a new oil futures contract mark a seismic shift in Beijing’s efforts to globalize its currency?

Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro speaks in Havana, Cuba, on Dec. 14, 2017. (Yamil Lage/AFP/Getty Images)

Why More Sanctions Won’t Help Venezuela

The people, not the government, will pay the price.

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