sanctions

French Economy  Minister Bruno Le Maire addresses a conference  on February 15, 2018 at the Economy Ministry in Paris.

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The European Union needs to defend its economic sovereignty from U.S. overreach. Creating its own agency for sanctions enforcement would be a start.

The United Nations Security Council meets on August 19, 2015 in New York City. (Photo credit: Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

At U.N., Russia and U.S. Wage Quiet War Over Appointments to Advance Broader Agendas

Tit for tat battle weakens the United Nations’ ability to enforce sanctions around the world.

U.S. President Donald Trump waves from the door of Air Force One upon arrival in Singapore on June 10. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

This Is What North Korea Sanctions Relief Should Look Like

If North Korea agrees to denuclearize, here's how Trump should go about rolling back sanctions.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo testifies before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on May 24. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

How Far Is Trump Willing to Go to Change Iran’s Behavior?

The Trump Team has shown its commitment to curbing Tehran — but remains stingy with the details.

Myanmar State Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi in Naypyidaw, Myanmar's capital, on May 22. (That Aung/AFP/Getty Images)

Myanmar’s Atrocities Demand New Sanctions

Rep. Eliot Engel’s sanctions legislation offers the right response to the Myanmar military’s campaign of murder and displacement.

The body of Jamal Affana, 15, is brought through a Rafa alleyway in the Gaza Strip on May 13 after he succumbed to a gunshot wound. Affana was killed by an Israeli sniper while participating in demonstrations.

Don’t Blame Hamas for the Gaza Bloodshed

Israel has a right to defend its borders, but shooting unarmed protesters who haven’t breached its frontier is disproportionate and illegal.

Angela Merkel, Emmanuel Macron, Donald Trump, and other leaders depart after posing for the group photo at the G7  summit on May 26, 2017 in Taormina, Italy.

How Europe Can Block Trump

After Washington exits the Iran deal, U.S. secondary sanctions could harm European companies. EU leaders should retaliate by reviving a tool used successfully in the 1990s.

U.S. President Donald Trump reinstates sanctions on Iran, after announcing his decision to withdraw the United States from the 2015 Iran nuclear deal, at the White House on May 8. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Leaving the Iran Nuclear Deal Will Have Unintended Consequences

Trump's actions may ultimately weaken the strength of sanctions as a tool of U.S. statecraft.

A Capital One bank and Bank of America are seen side bye side near Penn Station in New York on January 8, 2018 in New York. (Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images)

Do You Know Where Your Russian Oligarchs Are?

Democratic senators ask major banks to review individuals tied to Putin.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel speaks to visiting girls during the annual Girls' Day at the Chancellery on April 25, 2018 in Berlin, Germany.  (Carsten Koall/Getty Images)

Merkel to Press Trump on Russia Sanctions

Merkel and Macron are focused on European business when pushing back on Russia sanctions. Their concern for the Iran deal is different.

Then-U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, left, and Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif, right, prepare to discuss the Iran nuclear deal in Lausanne, Switzerland, on March 20, 2015. (Brian Snyder/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump’s Middle Ground on Iran Deal Sanctions Waivers Is a Myth

I helped negotiate the nuclear deal — and I know what would undo it.

Boris Johnson stands in front of St Basil's Cathedral during a visit to Red Square  on Dec. 22, 2017 in Moscow, Russia. (Stefan Rousseau-Pool/Getty Images)

Britain Has No Clue Why It’s Punishing Russia

Before you sanction Putin, it would help to know what you're after.

U.S. President Donald Trump chats with Russian President Vladimir Putin as they attend the APEC Economic Leaders' Meeting on Nov. 11, 2017. (Mikhail Klimentyev/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Finally Rolls Out Some (Limited) Russia Sanctions

The Treasury Department sanctioned Russian intelligence agencies and officials — again. But lawmakers and experts wonder when the real response will come.

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