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The Iranian Cyberthreat Is Real

As Trump increasingly boxes in Tehran, U.S. allies should be worried about the potential for a devastating cyberattack from the Islamic Republic.

Real estate tycoon Donald Trump flashes the thumbs-up as he arrives on stage for the start of the prime time Republican presidential debate on August 6, 2015 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. AFP PHOTO/MANDEL NGAN / AFP / MANDEL NGAN        (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

The Global Consequences of Trump’s Incompetence

From China to the Gulf to Europe, the world's power players are moving ahead without America.

The emir of Qatar, Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani speaks during a press conference following a summit on the post-Kadhafi held at the Elysee Palace in Paris on September 1, 2011. France hosts a "Friends of Libya" conference to allow states that stood by during the uprising that ousted Moamer Kadhafi to belatedly back Tripoli's fledgling revolutionary regime. AFP PHOTO / LIONEL BONAVENTURE (Photo credit should read LIONEL BONAVENTURE/AFP/Getty Images)

The Palace Intrigue at the Heart of the Qatar Crisis

The Saudis don’t believe the young emir of Qatar is really running the country — and they’re looking for regime change.

US President Donald Trump (R) and Qatar's Emir Sheikh Tamim Bin Hamad Al-Thani take part in a bilateral meeting at a hotel in Riyadh on May 21, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN        (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

It’s Time for the Trump Administration to Step Up in the Qatar Crisis

There’s leverage to be had and U.S. national security interests at stake. But if the United States doesn’t act now, things could get a whole lot worse.

US President Donald Trump is seated during the Arab Islamic American Summit at the King Abdulaziz Conference Center in Riyadh on May 21, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN        (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Why Trump Should Stand Down in the Gulf Crisis

The best course of action is for Washington to take a back seat to Kuwait’s efforts to negotiate an end to the Gulf impasse.

TOPSHOT - US President Donald Trump (C) makes his way to board Air Force One in Riyadh as he head with the First Lady to Israel on May 22, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN        (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Making the Middle East Worse, Trump-Style

American presidents have generally been pretty good at botching things in the Middle East, but this one is winning at it.

An undercover Iranian policeman (L) holds a weapon outside the Iranian parliament in the capital Tehran on June 7, 2017 during an attack on the complex. 
The Islamic State group claimed its first attacks in Iran as gunmen and suicide bombers killed at least five people in twin assaults on parliament and the tomb of the country's revolutionary founder in Tehran. / AFP PHOTO / FARS NEWS / Omid VAHABZADEH        (Photo credit should read OMID VAHABZADEH/AFP/Getty Images)

What the Islamic State Wants in Attacking Iran

With a spectacular and bloody assault in central Tehran, the Sunni jihadi group is fanning the flames of a sectarian war.

(L-R) Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May, US President Donald Trump and German Chancellor Angela Merkel arrive to watch an Italian flying squadron during the Summit of the Heads of State and of Government of the G7, the group of most industrialized economies, plus the European Union, on May 26, 2017 in Taormina, Sicily.
The leaders of Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Japan, the US and Italy will be joined by representatives of the European Union and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) as well as teams from Ethiopia, Kenya, Niger, Nigeria and Tunisia during the summit from May 26 to 27, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN        (Photo credit should read STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN/AFP/Getty Images)

Donald Trump’s Malarial Fever Trip

When Donald Trump departed on his maiden overseas trip, it was impossible to resist the comparison with the last time a president got out of town to escape such a vortex of scandals: the summer of 1974, when Richard Nixon jetted to the Middle East and Moscow just weeks before Watergate consumed him.

WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 15:  U.S. President Donald Trump (R) and Israel Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (L) shake hands following a joint news conference at the East Room of the White House February 15, 2017 in Washington, DC. President Trump hosted Prime Minister Netanyahu for talks for the first time since Trump took office on January 20.  (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Trump’s Middle East Trip Is Full of Traps

The stakes could not be higher for the president's first trip abroad. And he'll need to be careful and disciplined.

NEW YORK, NY - JANUARY 11:  President-elect Donald Trump speaks at a news cenference at Trump Tower  on January 11, 2017 in New York City. This is TrumpÕs first official news conference since the November elections.  (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Trump’s Farcical New Beginning With Muslims

The president’s trip to Saudi Arabia isn’t the start of a new relationship with the Arab world; it’s militarism, disdain for human rights, and caricature of religion.

TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY RIAD ABOU AWAD Palestinians watch an episode of the Syrian TV drama series "Bab al-Hara" at a cafe in Arab east Jerusalem, after breaking their fast on August 25, 2009. Arabic television is counting on an explosion of Ramadan serials to restore losses from the global recession, but some concerned Muslims are scrambling to pull the faithful back to prayer during the holy month.   AFP PHOTO /AHMAD GHARABLI (Photo credit should read AHMAD GHARABLI/AFP/Getty Images)

Can Good Television Beat the Islamic State?

How a Saudi television network — with a hand from Hollywood showrunners — is countering the narrative of terrorist propaganda.

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The Problem With Saudi Arabia’s ‘Terrorist’ Re-education

The Mohammed bin Nayef Center for Counseling and Care is supposed to rehabilitate terrorists. It isn’t working — and it’s allegedly being used to imprison critics of the kingdom.

A Saudi Airlines plane sits on the tarmac at Nice airport in southeastern France on July 26, 2015. King Salman of Saudi Arabia arrived in France for a Riviera holiday, with the closure of the beach in front of his villa incensing local residents. While the king's three-week visit with an entourage of nearly 1,000 is a boon for the local economy, the closure of a public beach for the privacy and security of the royal party -- along with illegal construction work -- has sparked anger. AFP PHOTO / VALERY HACHE        (Photo credit should read VALERY HACHE/AFP/Getty Images)

Saudi Arabia’s Royal Drug Problem

A drug bust in Lebanon Monday sheds light on the royal family's struggle with drug laws.

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Global Thinkers 2015 Issue Cover