South America

A child at the U.S.-Mexico fence in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, on April 4. (Herika Martinez/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump Is Playing Chicken With Children’s Lives

The U.S. child welfare system is strained to its limits. Family separation could push it over the edge.

Above: Two people look over the balcony on the second floor of the Parliament building in Georgetown on April 26. Top: In a section of Georgetown called Houston, contractors are building out a new oil industry depot, capable of storing needed equipment, fuel, water, cement, fluids, and other materials that contractors working in Guyana’s deep waters need. The base already has a contract to supply ExxonMobil. (Micah Maidenberg for Foreign Policy)

The Country That Wasn’t Ready to Win the Lottery

Guyana just discovered it owns enough oil to solve all its problems — and cause even bigger ones.

Colombian presidential candidate Gustavo Petro at a press conference in Bogotá on June 14. (Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images)

The Ghost of Hugo Chávez Is Haunting Colombia’s Election

Some Colombians fear that their country could go the way of Venezuela.

Hezbollah supporters in Beirut, Lebanon, on Aug. 14, 2007. (Marwan Naamani/AFP/Getty Images)

Lebanon Is Protecting Hezbollah’s Cocaine Trade in Latin America

The country's institutions are not a counterweight to Hezbollah, but its enablers.

Members of the Venezuelan National Guard take part in a ceremony on May 15, ahead of the May 20 presidential election, in Caracas. (Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images)

It’s Time for a Coup in Venezuela

Only nationalists in the military can restore a legitimate constitutional democracy.

Brazilian president Michel Temer (L) and Argentine President  Mauricio Macri arrive to pose for the official picture at the end of the Mercosur Summit in mendoza, 1080 km west of buenos Aires on July 21, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / Andres Larrovere        (Photo credit should read ANDRES LARROVERE/AFP/Getty Images)

The Trumpification of the Latin American Right

South American conservatives have an unlikely new role model.

A voter casts her ballot in the referendum to end the guerrilla war between the FARC and the Colombian government in Bogotá on Oct. 2, 2016. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Here’s How the United States Can Help Colombia Thrive

As an era of peace approaches, both countries should take practical steps to strengthen the relationship.

Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos, left, and U.S. President Donald Trump hold a joint news conference at the White House on May 18, 2017. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Colombia Is Ready to Join the Club

The United States should help its Latin American ally become a member of the OECD.

U.S. President Donald Trump and Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto during the G-20 Summit in Hamburg, Germany, on July 7, 2017. (Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

The U.S.-Mexico Relationship Has Survived and Thrived Under Trump

Contrary to conventional wisdom, the neighbors are finding ways to make it work.

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro, left, and Cuban President Raul Castro in Havana, Cuba, on Dec. 14, 2017. (Yamil Lage/AFP/Getty Images)

Cuba Is Making the Crisis in Venezuela Worse

Putting pressure on Caracas means holding Havana accountable.

U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson speaks during a joint press conference with Mexican Foreign Minister Luis Videgaray in Mexico City on Feb. 23, 2017.
(Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images)

Tillerson Praises Monroe Doctrine, Warns Latin America of ‘Imperial’ Chinese Ambitions

The secretary of state kicks off his multicountry tour trying to get the region to rally behind Trump.

A pro-government activist holds a portrait of late Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez, during a demonstration on Aug. 14, 2017. (Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images)

In 2018, Chavismo’s Time May Finally Run Out

U.S. policy toward Venezuela is changing — and so are political dynamics in Latin America.

The now-missing ARA San Juan submarine in Buenos Aires on May 23, 2014. (Alejandro Moritz/AFP/Getty Images)

Five Questions About the Missing Argentine Submarine

Despite a large international search effort, time is running out for the crew.

A Colombian anti-drugs police officer arranges packages of cocaine to be shown to the press on May 29, 2013, in Cali, department of Valle del Cauca, Colombia. Anti-narcotics unit of the National Police seized 1,4 tons of cocaine during an operation called "Republic 41". Authorities said the drug would be sent to Guatemala and belonged to the criminal gang "Los Rastrojos". AFP PHOTO/Luis ROBAYO        (Photo credit should read LUIS ROBAYO/AFP/Getty Images)

The United States is Losing the War on Drugs in the Americas

Eradication and interdiction are not foreign impositions, but essential pillars of any counternarcotics strategy, augmenting and working in concert with prevention and treatment-oriented policies.  

Load 10 More Articles