Terrorism

Dolkun Isa, the president of the World Uyghur Congress, in Tokyo on May 2, 2008. (Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)

U.S. Once Jailed Uighurs, Now Defends Them at U.N.

China tries to silence the group and lashes out at a U.S. diplomat.

France's President Emmanuel Macron addresses students at the North Rhine-Westphalia technical university on May 10, 2018 in Aachen, Germany (above); Supporters and elected officials of the far-right Front National protest the French government's immigration policies near the National Assembly on April 20, 2018 in Paris (below).

Saving European Democracy Starts at Home

If French President Emmanuel Macron is serious about pushing back against xenophobic populists, he needs to revamp his own legislative agenda.

A member of the Iraqi security forces after voting in Baghdad on May 10. (Ahmad al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images)

As Iraq Goes to the Polls, the U.S. and Iran Hang Back

For the first time since the military defeat of the Islamic State, Iraqis are voting for a new parliament. And Tehran and Washington aren’t getting in the way.

A flock of starlings flies over St. Peter's dome on Nov. 10, 2004. (PAOLO COCCO/AFP/Getty Images)

Italy Is Safe From, and for, Jihadis

It turns out not being attacked by the Islamic State is nothing to be proud of.

A U.S. Customs and Border Protection agent stands watch as a crowd of overseas visitors to the U.S. wait in line to pass through Customs January 5, 2004 at JFK airport in New York City. (Stephen Chernin/Getty Images)

Who Can Challenge the No-Fly List?

A prominent Pakistani doctor suspects he is on the no-fly list. He’s demanding the right to find out why.

MEK supporters demonstrate outside the Iranian embassy in Berlin, Germany on Dec. 28, 2009.  (Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Bolton’s Ascent Gives Iranian Group a New Lease on Life

With a supporter in the White House, the MEK might finally have a voice in U.S. policy.

FBI agents collect evidence at a FedEx Office facility following an explosion at a nearby sorting center on March 20, in Sunset Valley, Texas. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Trump’s Travel Ban Might Be Legal, but It’s Bad Policy

Most terrorists don’t get radicalized abroad; they’re made in the USA.

A Turkish tank on a hilltop overlooking the Turkey-Syria border on Oct. 9, 2014. (Gokhan Sahin/Getty Images)

When Diplomacy Disappears

The Trump Administration’s lack of engagement has made the terrorist threat worse.

Hezbollah supporters rally in Beirut, Lebanon, on Dec. 11, 2017. (AFP/Getty Images)

Why Is Trump Going Soft on Hezbollah?

Barack Obama did too little to curb the militant group, especially in Latin America. Donald Trump should do more.

Mike Pompeo during his confirmation hearing to be CIA director in Washington on Jan. 12, 2017. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Here’s What the Senate Should Ask Mike Pompeo

Democratic foreign-policy veterans want answers from Trump’s pick for secretary of state.

A member of the Iraqi security forces walks past an Islamic State logo on the outskirts of Mosul on March 1, 2017. (Ahmad al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images)

ISIS 2.0 Is Really Just the Original ISIS

Without territory, the Islamic State has quickly reverted back to its origins as a terrorist group.

An Iraqi army M1A1 Abrams tank on its way to Mosul, on Nov. 4, 2016. (Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images)

Made in America, But Lost in Iraq

U.S.-made tanks that fell into militia hands have sparked a standoff with Baghdad over assistance.

U.S. President Donald Trump brandishes a sword during a welcome ceremony in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia on May 20, 2017. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

Trump’s Middle East Strategy Is Totally Boring

There’s a very familiar method to the administration’s apparent regional madness.

A woman reads names on a commemorative plaque during a memorial ceremony for victims of an Islamic State attack at Istanbul's Ataturk airport, on June 28, 2016. (Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images)

Erdogan’s Fatal Blind Spot

The real threat to Turkey isn’t the Kurds. It’s the Islamic State.

Fireworks explode as singer Katy Perry performs during the Super Bowl halftime show at the University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, Arizona, on Feb. 1, 2015. (Andy Lyons/Getty Images)

What Would Happen if Terrorists Attacked the Super Bowl With Drones?

Small unmanned aircraft are a threat to high-profile events, but taking them down safely is almost impossible.

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