Turkey

A pedestrian lights a cigarette as he walks past in banners with portraits of Turrkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (L) and the leader of Nationalist Movement Party (MHP) Devlet Bahceli in Istanbul on June 19, 2018. - Turkey is preparing for tight presidential and parliamentary elections on June 24, while many analysts say President Erdogan wants a major foreign policy success to give him a final boost. (Photo by Aris MESSINIS / AFP)        (Photo credit should read ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images)

Read FP’s Coverage of Sunday’s Elections in Turkey

Turks will vote to elect not only a president but also a parliament—a first in the country’s history.

Supporters of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan wave the Turkish national flag during a pre-election rally in Sarajevo, on May 20. (Oliver Bunic/AFP/Getty Images)

Erdogan Is Making the Ottoman Empire Great Again

Turkey is leveraging tradition to expand its power in Europe — but the history cuts both ways.

A large flag of Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan at a campaign rally on June 19, 2018 in Istanbul, Turkey. (Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

Don’t Trust Anybody About Turkey’s Elections

The one thing that's clear about Erdogan's re-election bid is that everything is unclear.

Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images/Foreign Policy illustration

State of the Trade Wars

Tracking U.S. President Donald Trump’s tariffs — and the retaliatory measures other countries are taking.

An election poster showing the portrait of Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on June 19 in Istanbul, Turkey. (Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

Erdogan Will Win by Any Means Necessary

Turkey's president has plenty of experience stealing elections — and Sunday's vote is one he can't afford to lose.

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan walks down the stairs in between soldiers, wearing traditional army uniforms from the Ottoman Empire, as he arrives for a welcoming ceremony for Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas at the presidential palace in Ankara, January 12, 2015.

Don’t Turn The Turkish Army Into A Political Tool

Turkey has a history of coups. Whoever wins the election must prevent politicization of the military.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (R) and Chief of Staff General Hulusi Akar (L) attend the funeral of a soldier killed in a helicopter crash at Ahmet Hamdi Akseki Mosque in Ankara, on June 1, 2017.

Turkey’s Wag-the-Dog Election

Erdogan is fighting a military battle to win a political one.

Recep Tayyip Erdogan, flanked by his deputy Ali Babacan and Central Bank Governor Erdem Basci with the symbol for the national currency, the Turkish lira, during a ceremony in Ankara, on March 1, 2012. (ADEM ALTAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Erdogan Is Failing Economics 101

Turkey’s president has made a huge bet that he's right and all of the world’s economic experts are wrong.

(William Thomas Cain/Getty Images/Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images/Foreign Policy illustration)

Erdogan’s Flying Carpet

Istanbul’s massive new airport fits with Turkey’s grand neo-Ottoman ambitions, but it may be too big for its own good.

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How to Steal an Election in Broad Daylight

Autocrats and counterfeit democrats have perfected the art of rigging polls to stay in power — without breaking any laws.

Supporters of the Pro-Kurdish Peoples' Democratic Party (HDP) shout slogans and hold pictures of HDP's imprisoned presidential candidate Selahattin Demirtas  at an election rally on May 4, 2018 in Istanbul.

The Making of a Kurdish Mandela

By keeping a key challenger in jail, Turkey’s government risks making Selahattin Demirtas an even more popular and formidable opponent.

Syrian Kurdish leader Salih Muslim is escorted by Czech police to his trial at the municipal court on February 27, 2018 in Prague.

Turkey’s War on Dissent Goes Global

Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s government is abusing international law enforcement institutions to target its critics.

Recep Tayyip Erdogan makes a speach to supporters during a rally on June 16, 2013, in Istanbul. (OZAN KOSE/AFP/Getty Images)

Erdogan’s Motley Opponents Have United to Take Him Down

Turkey’s strongman might not be strong enough to survive the early elections he wanted.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan delivers a speech at the Grand National Assembly in Ankara on March 20. (Adem Altan/AFP/Getty Images)

Turkey Wants to Veto Civil Society Organizations at the OSCE

It wouldn’t be the first time Erdogan took domestic politics to the international arena.

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