U.S. President Joe Biden holds a pen as he prepares to sign a series of orders in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington on Jan. 20.

What to Expect in Biden’s First 100 Days in Foreign Policy

From climate change to China to ending the forever wars, here are 10 of the biggest challenges facing the Biden foreign-policy team as it takes office.

Members of the Guatemalan Army stand guard at a bridge after police and military officers turned away several groups of migrants who were part of a U.S.-bound caravan in Zacapa, Guatemala on Jan. 19.

Biden’s First Steps on Latin America

Only days into his presidency, he’s already changed the game on immigration.

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The World Is Glad to See Biden Take Office

In major countries, the new U.S. president starts with favorable approval ratings from day one.

Then-U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks at the National Press Club in Washington on Jan. 12.

No Amount of Swagger Can Dress Up Pompeo’s Legacy

The outgoing secretary of state prioritized his political ambitions over America’s interests.

South Korean President Moon Jae-in speaks during his New Year's speech at the presidential Blue House in Seoul on Jan. 11.

It’s Time for Justice, Not Healing

The United States needs to follow South Korea’s post-impeachment example.

Iraqis lit candles in memory of demonstrators who lost their lives as they mark the one-year anniversary of anti-government protests at Tahrir Square in Baghdad on Oct. 1, 2020.

Iraq’s Disappearance From Biden’s Agenda Is a Big Mistake

Upcoming elections offer an opportunity to turn Iraq around—and contain Iran in the process.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

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America and the World: How to Build Back Better

Looking back on 50 years of U.S. foreign policy and the lessons they hold for Washington today.

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A New Pivot to Asia

The fuzzy goodwill between Biden and America’s Asian allies will soon be tested by China’s growing power.

Foreign Policy Begins at Home

The best way for Biden to build better partnerships abroad is to get America’s own house in order—that starts with human rights.

Immigrants listen to the National Anthem

The 1776 Project Is a Desperate Search for the Right Enemies

Identity politics is painted as un-American—but historical patriots thought otherwise.

A face mask hangs in front of the New York Stock Exchange in New York on May 26, 2020.

What Can Insurance Tell Us About the Capitol Mob?

And how Biden can use economic theory to stave off more riots.

A man watches a television screen showing news footage of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un attending the 8th Congress of the ruling Workers' Party, held in Pyongyang, at a railway station in Seoul on Jan. 6.

North Korea’s New Sub Missile Is First Step Toward a New ICBM

Parading a new submarine-launched missile made a big buzz in North Korea. The real buzz is what it could mean for Pyongyang’s nuclear deterrent.

Donald Trump and  Boris Johnson arrive for a bilateral meeting during the G-7 summit on Aug. 25, 2019 in Biarritz, France.

Why Boris Johnson Won’t Clash With Joe Biden

Britain’s prime minister has always been a political weathervane, and he knows the wind from across the Atlantic is now blowing in a different direction.

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations nominee Linda Thomas-Greenfield speaks after being introduced by President-elect Joe Biden at the Queen Theatre in Wilmington, Delaware, on Nov. 24, 2020.

More Black Ambassadors Would Highlight America’s Greatest Strengths

An open position in China is an opportunity to show U.S. diversity.

European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen, European Council President Charles Michel, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, French President Emmanuel Macron, and Chinese President Xi Jinping are seen on a screen during a video conference to approve an investment pact between China and the European Union in Brussels on Dec. 30, 2020.

Europe Is Getting Closer to China, But Biden Can Pull It Back

In negotiations with Beijing over a new investment treaty, Brussels has asserted its autonomy from Washington. A human rights focus could repair the transatlantic rift.

A view of the U.S. Capitol and police tape ahead of the inaugural ceremony for President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris in Washington on Jan. 19.

A Democracy Summit Is More Urgent Than Ever

Jan. 6 gave the world’s democracies a glimpse of their own mortality, but it can also be a catalyst for revival.

President-elect Joe Biden announces key climate and energy appointments at the Queen theater in Wilmington, Delaware, on Dec. 19.

America Must Reclaim the Global Lead on Climate Change

Five places to start undoing the Trump administration’s damage and rebuilding U.S. leadership.

Then-U.S. Vice President Joe Biden and Assistant Secretary of State Roberta Jacobson

Biden to Tap Seasoned Former Diplomat to Oversee Southern Border Policy

Roberta Jacobson, a former U.S. ambassador to Mexico, will join the NSC and help oversee an anticipated U-turn in U.S. policy on migration and asylum.

Armin Laschet, North Rhine-Westphalia's State Premier and state chairman of the CDU, speaks in a studio in Cologne, Germany, on Jan. 9, 2021.

Is Armin Laschet Too Gemütlich?

Angela Merkel’s most likely successor is promising continuity with her style of politics—but that may not be up to him.

Voices

Revelers celebrate news of Joe Biden’s election as U.S. president in Washington on Nov. 7, 2020.

Biden’s Bold Gamble on Immigration Is About America’s Future

Failed immigration reform gave rise to Trumpism. Success could finally cool the debate.

The military honor guard arrives during the 59th Presidential Inauguration on Jan. 20, 2021 in Washington.

America Needs Protection. So Does the Regime.

The U.S. military secured Joe Biden’s inauguration. But the new administration also needs to treat the armed forces as a potential threat.

A statue of a woman by Lebanese artist Hayat Nazer, made out of leftover glass, rubble, and a broken clock marking the time (6:08 PM) of the mega explosion at the port of Beirut is placed opposite to the site of the blast in the Lebanese capital's harbour, to mark the one year anniversary of the beginning of the anti-government protest movement across the country, on October 20, 2020.

Syria’s Hidden Hand in Lebanon’s Port Explosion

Signs are adding up that the explosives in Beirut may have been intended for Damascus.

Workers raise a giant Ericsson signboard on top of a building in Beijing on Nov. 25, 1997.

How China Took Western Tech Firms Hostage

And what the United States and Europe can do about it.

A FOCUS ON RACE AND FOREIGN POLICY

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Why Is Mainstream International Relations Blind to Racism?

Ignoring the central role of race and colonialism in world affairs precludes an accurate understanding of the modern state system.

Black Lives Matter Protest London

When Did Racism Become Solely a Domestic Issue?

International relations theorists once explored racism. What has the field lost by giving that up?

Then-Libyan leader Muammar al-Qaddafi (R) speaks with presidents Jacob Zuma of South Africa (L) and Denis Sassou Nguesso of Republic of Congo (C) in Tripoli on April 10, 2011 during a meeting with a high-ranking African Union delegation trying to negotiate a truce between Qaddafi's forces and rebels seeking to oust him.

By Ignoring African Leaders, the West Paved the Way for Chaos in Libya

A race-based colonial mindset that views the continent as Europe’s playground and dismisses the concerns of Africans continues to fuel death and destruction.

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Why Race Matters in International Relations

Western dominance and white privilege permeate the field. It’s time to change that.

Special insights on the post-pandemic world

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The World After the Coronavirus

Twelve leading thinkers on geopolitics after the pandemic.

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The Future of Travel

Seven predictions for how tourism will change.

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Will Schools and Universities Ever Return to Normal?

Nine experts on the future of education after the pandemic.

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The Future of the State

Ten leading global thinkers on government after the pandemic.

visual stories

A protester carries an upside-down U.S. flag, a sign of distress, next to a burning building in Minneapolis on May 28. Protests broke out all across the nation—and in many other countries, including New Zealand, France, and Spain—over the death of George Floyd, a black man who died in Minneapolis police custody three days earlier. Julio Cortez/The Associated Press

Rising Up in Protest: A Year in Photos

Fists raised and voices lifted, people around the world took to the streets in 2020—to stand up against police brutality, demand democracy, and confront other injustices. A look at some of the photos that captured the year’s most defining movements.

A teacher wearing a biosecurity suit as a preventive measure against the spread of COVID-19 works with a girl at a home in Cali, Colombia, on Aug. 4 as part of a local kindergarten’s “teacher at home” program implemented to help children keep in touch with teachers and reduce the emotional impact of isolation. LUIS ROBAYO/AFP via Getty Images

The Global Pandemic: A Year in Photos

The coronavirus pandemic—the defining event of 2020—left no corner of the world untouched as it closed down countries, upset economies, and took the lives of nearly 2 million people. A look at some of the powerful images from this historic year.