U.S. President Donald Trump meets with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in the Oval Office of the White House on March 20. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

This Is America’s Middle East Strategy on Steroids

Donald Trump isn’t just maintaining an alliance with Saudi Arabia—he’s choosing it over the rest of the world.

Journalists protest against  sexual harassment in the workplace as part of the #MeToo campaign in New Delhi on Oct. 13. (Mohd Zakir/Hindustan Times/Getty Images)

A 2013 Law Helped Make India’s #MeToo Possible

But will it be enough for the movement to accomplish its goals?

Demonstrators rally outside the Federal Communications Commission building to protest against the end of net neutrality rules in Washington on Dec. 14, 2017. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Net Neutrality’s End Will Let Power Eat the Internet

Information is getting more centralized as online norms fracture.

Children read the Quran at a temporary shelter after the tsunami and earthquake in Palu, Indonesia, on Oct. 9. (Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)

Indonesia’s Indigenous Languages Hold the Secrets of Surviving Disaster

Introducing hard-learned local wisdom into warning efforts could save thousands of lives.

(Etienne Oliveau/Getty Images/Foreign Policy illustration)

China’s Great Leap Backward

For decades, the country managed to avoid most problems suffered by dictatorships. Now Xi Jinping’s personal power play risks undermining everything that made China exceptional.

Chinese tourist Zhang Lan, left, awaits X-rays during her check-up at a hospital in Asahikawa, in Hokkaido prefecture, Japan, on June 13, 2012. (Toshifumi Kitamura/AFP/Getty Images)

China’s Medical Tourists Are Steering Clear of U.S. Hospitals

Shoddy treatment at home is driving patients to Japan and Europe.

Voices

A police officer enters the Consulate General of Saudi Arabia in Istanbul, Turkey, as the search continues for Jamal Khashoggi, a journalist who has been missing since he entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2. (Onur Coban/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Jamal Khashoggi’s Disappearance Is Even Stranger Than It Seems

The Saudi journalist is presumed dead, but we may never know what happened to him.

An ice sculpture by the artistic duo Ligorano/Reese spells out the word “truth” in front of the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Sept. 22. (Olivia Hampton/AFP/Getty Images)

The Problem Isn’t Fake News From Russia. It’s Us.

Propaganda has long affected elections around the world because publics have an appetite for it.

U.S. flags flutter in strong wind in front of the Washington Monument in Washington, D.C., on March 2. (Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)

What Sort of World Are We Headed for?

The liberal world order never really existed. Great-power politics are here to stay.

Podcasts

Wendy Sherman, the U.S. undersecretary of state for political affairs, sits next to (from left) U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz, Robert Malley from the U.S. National Security Council, and European Union representative Helga Schmid during a negotiation session with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif over Iran's nuclear program in Lausanne, Switzerland, on March 20, 2015. (Brian Snyder/AFP/Getty Images)

In Negotiations With Iran, ‘There’s Always One More Thing’

On the podcast: Wendy Sherman recounts the grueling path to the Iran nuclear deal.

Galleries

A soldier from the Democratic Republic of the Congo is seen at a military base outside Oicha on Oct. 7. JOHN WESSELS/AFP/Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Soldiers in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, a rocket malfunction in Kazakhstan, and a human tower in Spain.

Displaced Yemeni children from the Hodeidah province shelter in a damaged house on Sept. 30 where they have been living with other displaced families in the southwestern Yemeni city of Taez. The conflict has triggered what the U.N. describes as the world's worst humanitarian crisis, with three-quarters of the population, or 22 million people in need of humanitarian aid. (Ahmad Al-Basha/AFP/Getty Images)

A Week in World Photos

Displaced children in Yemen, farmer protests in New Delhi, and a return to Earth in Kazakhstan.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

A cruise ship near the harbor of Ilulissat off the west coast of Greenland, north of the Arctic Circle, in August 2012. (Education Images/UIG via Getty Images)

Stretched Thin on Thin Ice

With the Arctic melting and northern coast guards struggling to keep up, the next disaster is a matter of when, not if.

Matt Chase illustration for Foreign Policy

Food Fight

Why the next big battle may not be fought over treasure or territory—but for fish.

The Taliban’s Fight for Hearts and Minds

The militants’ new strategy is to out-govern the U.S.-backed administration in Kabul—and it’s working.

Point and Nuke

Remembering the era of portable atomic bombs.

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