Workers and supporters of the ABS-CBN broadcaster stage a protest in the Philippines

After Signing Anti-Terrorism Law, Duterte Names His Targets

A supposed national security law in the Philippines is being used to silence dissenting voices.

Students at Harvard University

ICE Restrictions on International Students a ‘Self-Inflicted Wound’

More than a million scholars face an uncertain future as the Trump administration cracks down on immigrants of any stripe.

A French journalist takes a nap circa 1860

Journalism Has a Class Problem, Too

The increasingly narrow backgrounds of reporters distort coverage at home and abroad.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

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Crises Only Sometimes Lead to Change. Here’s Why.

The coronavirus pandemic won’t automatically lead to reforms. Great upheavals only bring systemic change when reformers have a plan—and the power to implement it.

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Welcome to the Post-Leader World

The United States has abdicated its dominant role. Here’s how to fill the gap.

Margrethe Vestager Is Still Coming for Big Tech

The coronavirus pandemic has made the world more reliant on technology. The EU’s competition commissioner says that makes her fight more urgent.

Welcome Back to Kissinger’s World

Neoconservatism has died, and liberal internationalism is discredited. Perhaps it’s time to return to the ideas of one of the last century’s greatest realists.

Chinese police

Xu Zhangrun Was China’s Loyal Opposition. Now, He’s In Jail.

One of the few remaining scholars openly standing against Xi Jinping is a reformist, not a revolutionary.

Air passengers wearing protective suits walk out of the arrival lounge of Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose International Airport in Kolkata, India, on July 6.

Trapped on the Wrong Side of the India-China Border

From a pandemic to geopolitics, for families and businesspeople caught by border closings, things are going from bad to worse.

Members of the Broadway cast of 'Hamilton,' perform music from the production for President Barack Obama, first lady Michelle Obama, and other guests in the East Room of the White House on March 14, 2016 in Washington.

Does ‘Hamilton’ Have All the Answers for U.S. Foreign Policy?

The Broadway musical offers lessons on everything from regime change to balancing ideals and interests.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan arrives on stage to deliver a speech following a cabinet meeting in Ankara on June 9.

The Turkish Government Closed a University Because It Fears Free Speech

Ankara shut an institution founded by religious conservatives and attacks tech companies in order to stop young Turks from accessing a free academic and media environment.

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Decolonize the State Department

As U.S. policymakers grapple with systemic racism, it’s time to start tapping the expertise of diasporas.

A displaced Syrian woman

Guilt by Location

Around the world, security forces use forced displacement as a means of sorting populations. To fix the global displacement crisis, it’s critical to understand how and why they do it.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi (right) welcomes Russian President Vladimir Putin prior to their meeting in New Delhi on Oct. 5, 2018. During the visit, India signed a $5 billion deal to buy Russian S-400 surface-to-air missile systems despite a U.S. law ordering sanctions on any country trading with Russia’s defense and intelligence sectors.

Why India and Russia Are Going to Stay Friends

Conventional wisdom holds that New Delhi will turn to Washington as it increases competition with Beijing. But Moscow’s importance cannot be ignored.

Chinese Ambassador to Lebanon Wang Kejian R presents a gift to Lebanese Culture Minister Abbas Mortada during a ceremony at the Lebanese Culture Ministry in Beirut, Lebanon, on May 27.

China Wants to Be Lebanon’s Savior

One of the Middle East’s most westernized outposts is falling apart—and looking east for a soft landing.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel wears a face mask with the logo of Germany’s EU presidency as she leaves the German Federal Council after a speech in Berlin on July 3.

Angela Merkel Is Back

As Germany takes over the EU presidency, the country’s chancellor has an opportunity to tackle some unfinished business.

Pakistan Army and Coronavirus

In Pakistan, the Army Tightens Its Grip

As military expenditure soars in Pakistan despite an unprecedented economic catastrophe, Khan’s power looks to be waning.

EU China Meeting

China Is NATO’s New Problem

The alliance has been so focused on Moscow that it has missed Beijing’s growing clout across Europe.

A FOCUS ON RACE AND FOREIGN POLICY

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Why Is Mainstream International Relations Blind to Racism?

Ignoring the central role of race and colonialism in world affairs precludes an accurate understanding of the modern state system.

Black Lives Matter Protest London

When Did Racism Become Solely a Domestic Issue?

International relations theorists once explored racism. What has the field lost by giving that up?

People walk down 16th Street in Washington after volunteers painted "Black Lives Matter" on the street near the White House on June 5.

Seeing Race In a Pandemic

How the physical environment affects our experience of difference.

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Why Race Matters in International Relations

Western dominance and white privilege permeate the field. It’s time to change that.

Special insights on the post-pandemic world

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The Future of Travel

Seven predictions for how tourism will change.

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Cities in the Future

12 experts on the coming transformations in urban life.

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The Fate of the Economy

Nine economists on a rapidly changing fiscal landscape.

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The Future of the State

Ten leading global thinkers on government after the pandemic.

Voices

National Security advisor Susan Rice and others listen while U.S. President Barack Obama makes a statement to the press after a meeting with commanders at the Pentagon Oct. 8, 2014 in Washington.

The Foreign-Policy Blob Is Structurally Racist

A social revolution could transform domestic policy—but it won’t change the way policy is conducted abroad.

Workers install a solar panel system on the roof of a home in Palmetto Bay, Florida, on Jan. 23, 2018.

The Post-Pandemic Economy Could Be Green and Clean—but Not With These Plans

Well-meaning green stimulus plans fall far short of what’s needed for the climate and the economy.

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Libya's interim leader Mustafa Abdel Jalil wave as they attend Friday prayers in Tripoli on Sept. 16, 2011.

Erdogan Is Libya’s Man Without a Plan

Turkey is standing in the wreckage of a foreign-policy adventure with no discernible strategy.

The USNS Comfort medical ship moves up the Hudson River past the Statue of Liberty as it arrives on March 30 in New York.

The Pandemic Should Kill Regime Change Forever

If the United States can’t stop a virus at home, there’s no reason to think it should ever try running another country.

visual stories

A woman smiles in a rice paddy field during National Paddy Day—which marks the start of the annual rice planting season—in Tokha village on the outskirts of Kathmandu, Nepal, on June 29. PRAKASH MATHEMA/AFP via Getty Images

The Week in World Photos

A Paddy Day romp in Nepal, masked protesters in France, and the coronavirus’s exhausting toll.

A midwife in training attends to one of the first patients of the day in the labor ward at Mirwais Hospital on Feb. 18.

The Midwives on the Front Lines

Despite rising violence, some of Afghanistan’s most vital workers are fighting stigma to deliver health care to the country’s mothers.