Portraits of Saudi King Salman bin Abdulazziz and his son Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman are seen on October 18, 2018 in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Jamal Khashoggi Had Skin in the Game. The Crown Prince’s Cheerleaders Didn’t.

Too often, Westerners treat courageous local experts like pawns in a political game. The journalist’s murder should serve as a reminder that, for some, writing an op-ed is a deadly risk.

Honduran migrants, heading in a caravan toward the United States, walk in Metapa, Mexico, on Oct. 22. (Pedro Pardo/AFP/Getty Images)

The World’s System for Resettling Refugees Benefits the United States

By dismantling it, Trump would leave the country—and refugees—worse off.

Iran is trying to maintain oil exports in the face of U.S. sanctions. An oil tanker off the Iranian port of Bandar Abbas on July 2, 2012. (Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images)

Can the U.S. Make Oil Sanctions on Iran Work?

Given pushback from friends and foes, Trump’s goal of zero Iranian exports is still far off.

Members of the Cameroonian Gendarmerie patrol in Omar Bongo Square in Buea, Cameroon’s majority-Anglophone southwestern province’s capital, during a political rally for incumbent President Paul Biya on Oct. 3. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)

Cameroon’s Paul Biya Gives a Master Class in Fake Democracy

One of the world’s most experienced autocrats has clinched another seven-year term by bending the rules of the game in his direction in ways both old and new.

(Joan Wong for Foreign Policy)

The Tourism Curse

Like a wealth of oil, lots of visitors can become a development trap. Here’s how to avoid it.

Geir Pedersen, right, then the U.N. special coordinator for Lebanon, and Michael Williams, the late U.N. troubleshooter, following a meeting with Lebanese Prime Minister Fuad Siniora in Beirut on Feb. 27, 2007. (Joseph Barrak/AFP/Getty Images)

Norwegian Diplomat Tops U.N. Shortlist For Syria Envoy

Geir Pedersen could be saddled with one of diplomacy’s most thankless tasks.

A truck transports a shipping container at a port in Zhangjiagang, China, on Aug. 7. (Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images)

The Trade War Has Claimed Its First Victim

Tariffs from the United States, Canada, China, Mexico, and the EU may have damaged the WTO beyond repair.

Voices

Saudi Arabia Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman attends the G20 opening ceremony at the Hangzhou International Expo Center on September 4, 2016 in Hangzhou, China. (Nicolas Asfouri/Getty Images)

The Saudis Are Killing America’s Middle East Policy

Mohammad bin Salman isn't just ruining his own reputation—he's spoiling Washington's policies across the region.

Three Congolese ride a motorbike and carry a cross for a grave in Mangina, North Kivu province, Democratic Republic of the Congo, on Aug. 23. (John Wessels/AFP/Getty Images)

Welcome to the First War Zone Ebola Crisis

The world thought it knew how to deal with Ebola outbreaks—but it’s never dealt with one like this before.

U.S. President Donald Trump meets with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in the Oval Office of the White House on March 20. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

This Is America’s Middle East Strategy on Steroids

Donald Trump isn’t just maintaining an alliance with Saudi Arabia—he’s choosing it over the rest of the world.

A police officer enters the Consulate General of Saudi Arabia in Istanbul, Turkey, as the search continues for Jamal Khashoggi, a journalist who has been missing since he entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2. (Onur Coban/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Jamal Khashoggi’s Disappearance Is Even Stranger Than It Seems

The Saudi journalist is presumed dead, but we may never know what happened to him.

Galleries

A boy adds to the light show from the Milky Way in the sky over the Tatacoa Desert, in Huila, Colombia, on Oct. 11. (Luis Acosta/AFP/Getty Images)

A Week in World Photos

A star search in Colombia, floods in France, and a migrant caravan in Guatemala.

A soldier from the Democratic Republic of the Congo is seen at a military base outside Oicha on Oct. 7. JOHN WESSELS/AFP/Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Soldiers in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, a rocket malfunction in Kazakhstan, and a human tower in Spain.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

A cruise ship near the harbor of Ilulissat off the west coast of Greenland, north of the Arctic Circle, in August 2012. (Education Images/UIG via Getty Images)

Stretched Thin on Thin Ice

With the Arctic melting and northern coast guards struggling to keep up, the next disaster is a matter of when, not if.

Matt Chase illustration for Foreign Policy

Food Fight

Why the next big battle may not be fought over treasure or territory—but for fish.

The Taliban’s Fight for Hearts and Minds

The militants’ new strategy is to out-govern the U.S.-backed administration in Kabul—and it’s working.

Point and Nuke

Remembering the era of portable atomic bombs.

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