Joe Biden at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware.

How Biden Will—and Won’t—Battle the Pentagon

What the new president really thinks about the military—and what the military really thinks about him.

Pao Ge Vang, 5, waits for the school bus to take him home after his second day in kindergarten at Herndon-Barstow Elementary School in Fresno, California, on Dec. 10, 2004. The Vangs are among thousands of Hmong refugees who fled Laos for Thailand 30 years ago and were part of the current U.S government resettlement program for up to 15,000 Hmong.

The United States Can’t Welcome More Refugees Without Reforming Its Resettlement System

Trump gutted the programs that helped aid and place migrants. Now Biden is left with a mess.

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Israel’s Government Has Nobody at the Wheel

A cycle of deadlocked elections has left the country without a functioning administration—and a foreign policy set on autopilot.

Israel's controversial separation wall runs between the Israeli settlement of Pisgat Zeev (left), built in a suburb of East Jerusalem, and the Palestinian Shuafat refugee camp (right) on Feb. 11.

The ICC’s Israel Investigation Could Backfire

It’s more likely to inflame nationalist sentiments than change anything on the ground.

A snack vendor in Dhaka, Bangladesh

Bangladesh’s Long Journey From ‘Basket Case’ to Rising Star

But 50 years after independence, an authoritarian turn casts a shadow over the country’s future.

Jake Sullivan speaks alongside President-elect Joe Biden.

The Sullivan Model

Jake Sullivan, Biden’s “once-in-a-generation intellect,” is facing a once-in-a-generation challenge.

Bharatiya Janata Party leader Narendra Modi takes a selfie with his mobile phone after voting at a polling station in Ahmedabad, India, on April 30, 2014.

You Say ‘Coup,’ I Say ‘Koo’

India is a warning about unintended consequences for those looking to regulate Big Tech in the United States.

A police van outside the Grand Mosque in Shadian, China.

China’s Crackdown on Islam Brings Back Memories of 1975 Massacre

Islamophobia has spread far beyond the persecuted Uyghur minority.

The French philosopher and writer Bernard-Henri Lévy in Paris on Nov. 24, 1986.

It’s Time to Take Bernard-Henri Lévy Seriously

A close reading of the philosophical career, and influence, of France’s most ridiculed public intellectual.

People protest against anti-Asian violence.

We Don’t Have the Words to Fight Anti-Asian Racism

Tangled questions of Asian identity need answers that aren’t defined by U.S. terminology alone.

Palestinian woman walks past election mural in Gaza.

The Return of Palestinian Politics

Elections in May will be the first since 2006—a remarkable but risky gambit.

A view of a damaged school building due to bombardment by pro-government forces in Kansafra, in Syria's Idlib province, on March 3.

10 Years On, Syrians Have Not Given Up

A survivor of regime atrocities explains why the international community must act.

A nurse holds a newborn baby wearing a face shield in an effort to halt the spread of COVID-19, at Praram 9 Hospital in Bangkok, on April 9, 2020.

COVID-19’s Baby Bust

Disasters usually come with falling birth rates. But this time, they might not recover unless governments take action now.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

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America and the World: How to Build Back Better

Looking back on 50 years of U.S. foreign policy and the lessons they hold for Washington today.

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A New Pivot to Asia

The fuzzy goodwill between Biden and America’s Asian allies will soon be tested by China’s growing power.

Foreign Policy Begins at Home

The best way for Biden to build better partnerships abroad is to get America’s own house in order—that starts with human rights.

A sweeper cleans a deserted bus station after the provincial government suspended public transport during a lockdown in Peshawar, Pakistan, on April 3.

Pakistan’s Geoeconomic Delusions

The country says it wants to pivot from hard power to economic power, but its economy begs to differ.

People pray in the Great Mosque of Paris.

French Secularism Isn’t Illiberal

Letting culture wars drive debate about “laïcité” obscures similarities between France and the United States.

A woman examines a display of books about Chinese President Xi Jinping.

The U.S.-China Clash Is About Ideology After All

Claims that the rivalry is purely geopolitical don’t hold water.

Protesters hold homemade weapons during a demonstration against the military coup in Yangon's Tamwe township in Myanmar on April 3.

Myanmar Is on the Precipice of Civil War

Existing conflicts with ethnic groups add fuel to the fire.

European Executive Vice President Margrethe Vestager

Big Talk on Big Tech—but Little Action

In both the U.S. and EU, antitrust and regulatory efforts against Facebook, Google, and Amazon are gaining traction. But no one’s about to break them up.

People carry their belongings while walking in a flooded street.

Britain’s Immigration Overhaul Is Shortsighted

The United Kingdom needs to prepare for future climate migrants rather than obsessing over asylum-seekers.

Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks during a rally marking the seventh anniversary of Russia’s annexation of Crimea at the Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow on March 18.

Russians Aren’t Buying Putin’s PR Stunts Anymore

To save its approval ratings, the Kremlin might be better focusing its energy elsewhere.

Mohamed Salah of Liverpool scores a goal against Manchester United.

Soccer’s Financial Crisis Could Transform Leagues Forever

Private equity’s power may eliminate promotion and relegation.

Voices

Solar panel technicians check a solar panel in the final stage of production in Baoding, Hebei Province.

When Clean Energy Is Powered by Dirty Labor

Most solar panels come from China, and using them to fuel a clean energy transition risks reliance on Uyghur slave labor.

Xi Jinping with PLA soldiers in Hong Kong

Yes, You Can Use the T-Word to Describe China

China is governed by a totalitarian regime. Why is that so hard to say?

Recep Tayyip Erdogan salutes his supporters during a rally at Istanbul's Yenikapi fairground to show solidarity with Palestinians after Israels aggression against Palestinian civilians on the Gaza border in Istanbul on May 18, 2018.

How Erdogan Got His Groove Back

It’s been a difficult and dizzying few months for Turkey—which is just the way the president likes it.

Peter Dutton speaks in Australia's parliament.

Will Australia’s New Defense Minister Play Bad Cop to China?

Peter Dutton stopped the refugee boats. His next job is stopping Beijing’s maritime militia.

A FOCUS ON RACE AND FOREIGN POLICY

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Why Is Mainstream International Relations Blind to Racism?

Ignoring the central role of race and colonialism in world affairs precludes an accurate understanding of the modern state system.

Black Lives Matter Protest London

When Did Racism Become Solely a Domestic Issue?

International relations theorists once explored racism. What has the field lost by giving that up?

Nelson Mandela visits Hlengiwe School in Johannesburg on May 1, 1993.

Put Racial Justice at Center of the Biden-Harris Transition Plan

The new administration can learn from South Africa’s experience with transitional justice.

George Floyd mural unveiled in Brooklyn.

As America Seeks Racial Justice, It Can Learn From Abroad

Other countries offer good lessons for acknowledging and redressing past wrongs.

visual stories

Francisco, 34, an asylum-seeking migrant from Honduras, cradles his 9-month-old daughter, Megan, from the early morning cold and wind in La Joya, Texas, as they await transportation to a processing center after crossing the Rio Grande into the United States from Mexico on a raft March 25. Adrees Latif/REUTERS

The Month in World Photos

March brought a new wave of migrants at the U.S. border—plus the pope’s historic visit to Iraq, continued bloodshed in Myanmar, and a colossal logjam in the Suez Canal.

Dressed as Marianne, a symbol of the French republic, members of the conservative activist group Manif pour Tous (“Protest for Everyone”) mark International Women’s Day by protesting against assisted reproductive technology and surrogacy in front of the National Assembly in Paris on March 8. LIONEL BONAVENTURE/AFP via Getty Images

Rising Up in Protest: A Year in Photos

Fists raised and voices lifted, people around the world took to the streets in 2020—to stand up against police brutality, demand democracy, and confront other injustices. A look at some of the photos that captured the year’s most defining movements.