Indian soldiers patrol along a barbed-wire fence near Baras Post on the Line of Control on Dec. 4, 2003.

War Is Over Between India and Pakistan—for Now

A new cease-fire at the Line of Control must avoid problems that have derailed past attempts at peace.

Workers pack syringes at the Hindustan Syringes and Medical Devices factory in Faridabad, India, on Sept. 2, 2020.

To Democratize Vaccine Access, Democratize Production

U.S. and European COVID-19 shots aren’t enough. It is time to tap into Africa, Asia, and Latin America’s enormous production capacity.

A worker wearing a protective suit and carrying an umbrella walks past the graves of COVID-19 victims at the Nossa Senhora Aparecida cemetery, in Manaus, Brazil, on Feb. 25, 2021. - Brazil surpassed 250,000 deaths due to COVID-19.

Brazil’s COVID-19 Crisis Is Only Getting Worse

As Brazil’s hospitals reach capacity, a new highly transmissible variant has complicated an already haphazard response.

Chinese President Xi Jinping’s book, translated into foreign languages, is on display during the opening ceremony of a high-level meeting held by the Chinese Communist Party at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, on Dec. 1, 2017.

The One-Sided War of Ideas With China

As Washington ramps up to defend democracy, Beijing is still motivated mostly by geography.

U.S. President Joe Biden steps off Air Force One upon arrival at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland on March 1.

Can Biden Finally Put the Middle East in Check and Pivot Already?

The new administration, like previous ones, has a Middle East quagmire. But it’s trying some nuanced moves to break free.

A man walks past a billboard of for the construction of an oil refinery and storage facility in the port city of Hambantota, Sri Lanka on March 24, 2019.

Chinese BRI Investment Isn’t All Bad—or Good

As Sri Lanka shows, when it comes to Chinese debt, small states have agency and great powers have responsibilities.

Policemen inspect the facilities at a coal mine in Changji in northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region on Feb. 21.

Meet Today’s Masters of the Universe

“The World for Sale” peels back the cover on the secretive—and sometimes shady—people who make the modern world go around.

A photo from the film Quo Vadis, Aida?

Oscar-Shortlisted Film Puts Bosnian Genocide on Silver Screen

“Quo Vadis, Aida?” could do for the Srebrenica massacre what “Schindler’s List” accomplished for the Holocaust.

A person wears a QAnon sweatshirt during a pro-Trump rally

America’s Conspiratorial Delusions Weren’t Born Under Trump

False realities have been part of the U.S. political scene for decades.

After waiting for hours, Nazir Ahmad Kondoo rows his boat toward other fishermen on Anchar Lake in Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, on Feb. 16.

The Last Fishermen of Kashmir

Once teeming lakes are fast disappearing and with them, a lucrative career for tens of thousands of people in the region.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

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America and the World: How to Build Back Better

Looking back on 50 years of U.S. foreign policy and the lessons they hold for Washington today.

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A New Pivot to Asia

The fuzzy goodwill between Biden and America’s Asian allies will soon be tested by China’s growing power.

Foreign Policy Begins at Home

The best way for Biden to build better partnerships abroad is to get America’s own house in order—that starts with human rights.

Protesters wearing traditional “thanakha,” a yellowish-white cosmetic paste made from ground bark applied on the face, hold placards and shout slogans during a demonstration against the military coup in Yangon, Myanmar, on Feb. 25.

Why China Favors Democracy Over Dictatorship in Myanmar

For Beijing, a reliable democratic government is better than an unpredictable and expansionist military junta.

Abdolnaser Hemmati (C), Governor of the Central Bank of Iran, listens to a speech in parliament in Tehran on Oct. 7, 2018.

U.S.-Iran Talks Will Falter Unless Abdolnaser Hemmati Is at the Table

Unwinding sanctions will be central to reviving the nuclear deal. If the Biden administration wants a lasting solution, it must involve Iran’s central bank governor.

A lion dancer moves down the street outside the Chinese Kali temple in Tangra, Kolkata, on Feb. 11, the eve of Lunar New Year.

In Kolkata, Only a Few Lions Are Still Dancing

A 2-century-old Indian Chinese community is threatened by tensions between the two countries.

Director Terry George talks to Rwandan President Paul Kagame

Paul Kagame Celebrated ‘Hotel Rwanda’—Until Its Hero Criticized Him

Rwanda’s president once welcomed the Hollywood film. His recent attacks on the movie and its protagonist show that his government cannot handle dissent.

Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamanei delivers remarks on the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action for Iran in Tehran on Feb. 17.

Who Is Hot and Who Is Not in the Middle East

The Biden administration wants to downgrade the region. Here are the countries he can ignore—and the ones he can’t.

Photographers, including Jawad Jalali, take shelter as a new explosion is heard while photographing an attack in Kabul in this archival photo.

‘This is the Darkest Moment’: Afghans Flee a Crumbling Country

The educated middle classes that were meant to be the foundation of a new Afghanistan are tired of terror, insecurity, and the return of the Taliban.

An Indian Army convoy drives toward Leh, a town in northern India, on a highway bordering China on Sept. 2, 2020.

Did India Just Win at the Line of Actual Control?

Beijing and New Delhi may be disengaging in the Pangong Tso lake region, but their divisions are more fraught than ever.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel welcomes Russia's President Vladimir Putin

Germany Will Never Back Down on Its Russian Pipeline

If it looks like Berlin is colluding with Moscow, that’s because it is.

Voices

U.S. President-elect Joe Biden

Biden’s Plan to Lead From Alongside

The new U.S. president believes in the legitimacy of American power. Does the rest of the world?

Commuters sleep while waiting for the Otay Mesa Port of Entry to open to cross to the United States from Tijuana, Mexico

The Human Cost of Endless Pandemic Border Closures

One year after the world declared borders shut, there is still no plan to reduce the toll on millions of lives.

A cutout of an Israeli soldier and a sign in the Golan Heights

The Axis of Resistance to Israel Is Breaking Up

Syria has turned against Hamas, and Iran’s efforts to mediate aren't working.

Indian Air Force Tejas fighter jets perform at the Aero India air show at Yelahanka Air Force Station in Bangaluru, on Feb. 3.

How Did India Manage to Build an Advanced Fighter Jet Like the Tejas?

When it comes to sensitive industries like defense, democracy and the rule of law do matter.

A FOCUS ON RACE AND FOREIGN POLICY

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Why Is Mainstream International Relations Blind to Racism?

Ignoring the central role of race and colonialism in world affairs precludes an accurate understanding of the modern state system.

Black Lives Matter Protest London

When Did Racism Become Solely a Domestic Issue?

International relations theorists once explored racism. What has the field lost by giving that up?

Nelson Mandela visits Hlengiwe School in Johannesburg on May 1, 1993.

Put Racial Justice at Center of the Biden-Harris Transition Plan

The new administration can learn from South Africa’s experience with transitional justice.

Economic Freedom Fighters supporters gather in front of the U.S. Embassy in Pretoria, on June 8 in solidarity with the global Black Lives Matter movement.

The Legacy of American Racism

Domestic racism has long impacted U.S. foreign policy. It’s time to open up about it.

Special insights on the post-pandemic world

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The World After the Coronavirus

Twelve leading thinkers on geopolitics after the pandemic.

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The Future of Travel

Seven predictions for how tourism will change.

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Will Schools and Universities Ever Return to Normal?

Nine experts on the future of education after the pandemic.

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The Future of the State

Ten leading global thinkers on government after the pandemic.

visual stories

A pro-democracy protester is detained by riot police officers during a rally against the military coup in Yangon, Myanmar, on Feb. 27. Stringer/REUTERS

The Month in World Photos

February brought unrest in Myanmar after a military coup—plus a spectacular volcanic show in Italy, a reopened border for asylum seekers in the United States, and a celebrated landing on Mars.

A protester embraces a member of the Belarusian Interior Ministry troops who was standing guard during a demonstration against police violence and rejecting the presidential election results in Minsk, Belarus, on Aug. 14. Vasily Fedosenko/REUTERS

Rising Up in Protest: A Year in Photos

Fists raised and voices lifted, people around the world took to the streets in 2020—to stand up against police brutality, demand democracy, and confront other injustices. A look at some of the photos that captured the year’s most defining movements.