Then-Human Rights Watch director Sarah Margon

Biden Looks to Progressive for Key Human Rights Post

Sarah Margon has been an outspoken critic of authoritarian allies of the United States.

A man wearing personal protective equipment performs the last rites for a relative who died from COVID-19 at a crematorium in New Delhi on April 20.

India Is Seeing a Terrifying Second Wave of COVID-19

As families beg for help on social media, the government plays politics.

Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, Brazil's former president, speaks during a press conference after convictions against him were annulled in Sao Bernardo do Campo, Brazil, on March 10.

Brazil’s Most Popular Politician Might Dial Back Bolsonaro’s Legacy—but Won’t Take the Country Into the Future

Lula may offer the strongest alternative to Bolsonaro, yet his policies for Brazil won’t address the country’s challenges.

A woman holds Taiwanese flag during local elections in Taipei on Nov. 24, 2018.

India’s Vaccine Diplomacy Reaches Taiwan

As New Delhi and Taipei draw closer together, the map of the Asia-Pacific could change for good.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson chairs a virtual session of the UN Security Council on climate and security in London on Feb. 23.

Boris Johnson’s Climate Rhetoric Lacks a Real Blueprint for Change

For the post-Brexit United Kingdom, climate leadership is easier aspired to than achieved.

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti addresses a crowd of protesters opposed to Trump administration immigration policies in Los Angeles on June 30, 2018.

Why U.S. Cities and States Should Play a Bigger Role in Foreign Policy

Part of making foreign policy work better for Americans is empowering local leaders.

U.S. troops return home from Afghanistan

‘Bring the Troops Home’ Is a Dream, Not a Strategy

A full withdrawal from Afghanistan is a costly blunder and failure of leadership.

A mujra dancer on stage in Pakistan.

‘Showgirls of Pakistan’ Doesn’t Need Your Victim Narrative

In a new documentary about mujra dancers, Saad Khan escapes the Western documentary complex to give his subjects the chance to speak in their own words.

Russian warships and military jets take part in a military exercise.

Russia Further Ramps Up Military Pressure on Ukraine

Moscow could just be strong-arming Kyiv and Washington—or preparing another invasion.

An Afghan man belonging to the Uzbek ethnic group feeds pigeons in front of the shrine of Hazrat-i-Ali, in Mazar-i-Sharif the capital of the northern Afghan Balkh province on June 2, 2007.

Afghans Don’t Need U.S. Troops. They Need Islands of Stability.

Here’s how the Biden administration can prevent chaos in Afghanistan, even after it withdraws.

A woman waits for her son to arrive in Pemba, Mozambique, on a boat of evacuees from the coasts of Palma on April 1.

Why Experts Ignore Terrorism in Africa

If the world really cares about the continent’s future, it will start paying attention now.

A U.S. soldier dressed in a World War II military uniform picks up sand from Omaha beach next to a U.S. soldier looking at a man driving a horse sulky on the sidelines of a ceremony in Saint-Laurent-sur-Mer, western France, on June 5, 2019.

The U.S. Military Needs Citizen-Soldiers, Not Warriors

The recent obsession with the term is misguided and harmful.

A commuter trades plastic bottles to be recycled for transit credit.

Italy’s Economic Recovery Plan Needs to Think Local

Already a circular economy leader in technology, Italy must involve communities if its “green recovery” is to succeed.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

50-years-zakaria-tepperman-foreign-policy-noma-bar-illustration-HP

America and the World: How to Build Back Better

Looking back on 50 years of U.S. foreign policy and the lessons they hold for Washington today.

Biden-China-asia-pivot-mojo-wang-illustration_hp

A New Pivot to Asia

The fuzzy goodwill between Biden and America’s Asian allies will soon be tested by China’s growing power.

Foreign Policy Begins at Home

The best way for Biden to build better partnerships abroad is to get America’s own house in order—that starts with human rights.

Soybeans are harvested

Big Agriculture Is Best

The United States’ industrialized food system moved millions of people out of poverty and is better for the environment.

Angela Merkel (L) speaks with Joe Biden at the start of their meeting at the Chancellery on Feb. 1, 2013 in in Berlin.

Biden’s Refugee Policy Is a Profile in Cowardice

As immigration becomes a political crisis, the U.S. president has chosen pandering to nativists over problem-solving.

Australian infantrymen sit on a transport as they head toward the beach at Gallipoli, Turkey, in 1915.

The Real Reason Britain Gambled at Gallipoli

A new book argues that Churchill’s famous folly was ultimately about food, fear, and free trade.

Pedestrians walk in China.

‘Smart’ Cities Are Surveilled Cities

When everyone and everything is connected, the door is open to all kinds of digital threats.

Joe Biden

How Biden Changed His Mind on Afghanistan

After 9/11, Biden embraced the idea that U.S. troops should leave the country better than how they found it. Now, as president, he’s withdrawing them regardless.

Supporters of Naxalite People’s War Group wait for leaders to address a public meeting in India’s Guntur district on Oct. 11, 2004.

India Embattled

The country can’t contain insurgent movements until it has a comprehensive national plan for tackling them.

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks about climate change issues,

Biden Plans Big Pledge on U.S. Emissions Cuts

Washington wants to reclaim climate leadership and get other major countries to ramp up ambitions.

A U.S. soldier during Operation Khanjari in Afghanistan.

Biden Just Made a Historic Break With the Logic of Forever War

But will he really end the United States’ other open-ended conflicts?

Voices

U.S. President Joe Biden walks through Arlington National Cemetery.

Biden’s War at Home Over Afghanistan Is Just Beginning

After making the right call on withdrawal, the U.S. president better get ready for second-guessing.

King Abdullah II bin Al Hussein of Jordan speaks at the United Nations General Assembly on September 24, 2019 in New York City.

Jordan’s King Is His Own Worst Enemy

There’s much more evidence of the monarch’s poor governance than a foreign conspiracy against him.

Solar panel technicians check a solar panel in the final stage of production in Baoding, Hebei Province.

When Clean Energy Is Powered by Dirty Labor

Most solar panels come from China, and using them to fuel a clean energy transition risks reliance on Uyghur slave labor.

Xi Jinping with PLA soldiers in Hong Kong

Yes, You Can Use the T-Word to Describe China

China is governed by a totalitarian regime. Why is that so hard to say?

A FOCUS ON RACE AND FOREIGN POLICY

race-international-relations-colonialism-foreign-policy-illustration

Why Is Mainstream International Relations Blind to Racism?

Ignoring the central role of race and colonialism in world affairs precludes an accurate understanding of the modern state system.

Black Lives Matter Protest London

When Did Racism Become Solely a Domestic Issue?

International relations theorists once explored racism. What has the field lost by giving that up?

Nelson Mandela visits Hlengiwe School in Johannesburg on May 1, 1993.

Put Racial Justice at Center of the Biden-Harris Transition Plan

The new administration can learn from South Africa’s experience with transitional justice.

George Floyd mural unveiled in Brooklyn.

As America Seeks Racial Justice, It Can Learn From Abroad

Other countries offer good lessons for acknowledging and redressing past wrongs.

visual stories

Francisco, 34, an asylum-seeking migrant from Honduras, cradles his 9-month-old daughter, Megan, from the early morning cold and wind in La Joya, Texas, as they await transportation to a processing center after crossing the Rio Grande into the United States from Mexico on a raft March 25. Adrees Latif/REUTERS

The Month in World Photos

March brought a new wave of migrants at the U.S. border—plus the pope’s historic visit to Iraq, continued bloodshed in Myanmar, and a colossal logjam in the Suez Canal.

Dressed as Marianne, a symbol of the French republic, members of the conservative activist group Manif pour Tous (“Protest for Everyone”) mark International Women’s Day by protesting against assisted reproductive technology and surrogacy in front of the National Assembly in Paris on March 8. LIONEL BONAVENTURE/AFP via Getty Images

Rising Up in Protest: A Year in Photos

Fists raised and voices lifted, people around the world took to the streets in 2020—to stand up against police brutality, demand democracy, and confront other injustices. A look at some of the photos that captured the year’s most defining movements.