Cracked mud is pictured at sunrise on the dried shores of Lake Gruyère, affected by continuous drought, near the western Swiss village of Avry-devant-Pont. (Fabrice Cofrin/AFP/Getty Images)

The Hope at the Heart of the Apocalyptic Climate Change Report

Along with their latest dire predictions, the world’s leading climate scientists offered a new path forward—but will anyone take it?

Nikki Haley, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, chairs a meeting of the U.N. Security Council on Sept. 17. (Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Can Nikki Haley Deliver One Last Time?

It’s not too late for Trump’s departing U.N. ambassador to cut Washington’s peacekeeping costs.

A footbridge over the Nujiang River near Bingzhongluo, in Nujiang prefecture, China, on April 10. The bridge links the increasingly modern village of Bingzhongluo with a group of subsistence agricultural communities found at higher altitudes. (Edward Cavanough for Foreign Policy)

Nowhere to Run in Xi’s China

The Chinese leader’s cult reaches into the most remote regions of the country.

Indians take pictures of a Durga idol inside a makeshift "pandal" structure in Kolkata on Oct. 16. (DIBYANGSHU SARKAR/AFP/Getty Images)

India’s Sleeping Tech Giants Are About to Awaken

A weak rupee could be just the push the Big Five need.

(Courtesy of Kevin Joseph Carrico/Foreign Policy illustration)

I Mastered Xi Jinping Thought, and I Have the Certificate to Prove It

Study of the leader’s half-baked ideas is increasingly compulsory in China.

A photo of Vanessa García when she was 16 with her 27-year-old boyfriend, who used the alias Darío Lulo, during their time with the FARC. Vanessa became pregnant and says she was forced to abort his child. (Erika Piñeros for Foreign Policy)

The Women Abandoned by Peace

Victims of sexual violence and forced abortion during Colombia’s long years of conflict have yet to see justice.

Dollar and yuan notes are seen at a bank in Beijing on May 15, 2006. (China Photos/Getty Images)

China’s Dangerous Dollar Addiction

China pays for raw materials in greenbacks, but Trump’s trade war could soon dwindle its dollar reserves.

Voices

Three Congolese ride a motorbike and carry a cross for a grave in Mangina, North Kivu province, Democratic Republic of the Congo, on Aug. 23. (John Wessels/AFP/Getty Images)

Welcome to the First War Zone Ebola Crisis

The world thought it knew how to deal with Ebola outbreaks—but it’s never dealt with one like this before.

U.S. President Donald Trump meets with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in the Oval Office of the White House on March 20. (Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images)

This Is America’s Middle East Strategy on Steroids

Donald Trump isn’t just maintaining an alliance with Saudi Arabia—he’s choosing it over the rest of the world.

A police officer enters the Consulate General of Saudi Arabia in Istanbul, Turkey, as the search continues for Jamal Khashoggi, a journalist who has been missing since he entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2. (Onur Coban/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Jamal Khashoggi’s Disappearance Is Even Stranger Than It Seems

The Saudi journalist is presumed dead, but we may never know what happened to him.

Podcasts

Wendy Sherman, the U.S. undersecretary of state for political affairs, sits next to (from left) U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz, Robert Malley from the U.S. National Security Council, and European Union representative Helga Schmid during a negotiation session with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif over Iran's nuclear program in Lausanne, Switzerland, on March 20, 2015. (Brian Snyder/AFP/Getty Images)

In Negotiations With Iran, ‘There’s Always One More Thing’

On the podcast: Wendy Sherman recounts the grueling path to the Iran nuclear deal.

Galleries

A soldier from the Democratic Republic of the Congo is seen at a military base outside Oicha on Oct. 7. JOHN WESSELS/AFP/Getty Images

A Week in World Photos

Soldiers in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, a rocket malfunction in Kazakhstan, and a human tower in Spain.

Displaced Yemeni children from the Hodeidah province shelter in a damaged house on Sept. 30 where they have been living with other displaced families in the southwestern Yemeni city of Taez. The conflict has triggered what the U.N. describes as the world's worst humanitarian crisis, with three-quarters of the population, or 22 million people in need of humanitarian aid. (Ahmad Al-Basha/AFP/Getty Images)

A Week in World Photos

Displaced children in Yemen, farmer protests in New Delhi, and a return to Earth in Kazakhstan.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

A cruise ship near the harbor of Ilulissat off the west coast of Greenland, north of the Arctic Circle, in August 2012. (Education Images/UIG via Getty Images)

Stretched Thin on Thin Ice

With the Arctic melting and northern coast guards struggling to keep up, the next disaster is a matter of when, not if.

Matt Chase illustration for Foreign Policy

Food Fight

Why the next big battle may not be fought over treasure or territory—but for fish.

The Taliban’s Fight for Hearts and Minds

The militants’ new strategy is to out-govern the U.S.-backed administration in Kabul—and it’s working.

Point and Nuke

Remembering the era of portable atomic bombs.

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