Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (L) speaks with then-U.S. Vice President Joe Biden March 23, 2010 in Washington.

How Israel Should Prepare for Biden’s New Approach to Iran

Israeli officials should urge the new administration to maintain U.S. economic leverage over Iran while avoiding the personal vendettas and public policy feuds of the Obama era.

A French Rafale fighter jet prepares to land on the aircraft carrier "Charles de Gaulle" during a joint Indo-French naval exercise off Goa, India, on May 9, 2019.

The Quad’s Malabar Exercises Point the Way to an Asian NATO

India, Japan, Australia, and the United States have a good model if they want to keep the peace without threatening China.

U.S. President-elect Joe Biden and his planned nominee for secretary of state, Antony Blinken, look on during an event introducing key foreign-policy and national security members of the incoming Biden-Harris administration in Wilmington, Delaware, on Nov. 24.

Say No, Joe

On U.S. foreign policy, there’s no going back to the status quo.

A woman walks next to a child by tents at Camp Roj, housing family members of people accused to belong to the Islamic State group, in Syria’s northeastern Hasakah province on Sept. 30.

What to Do About the Children of the Islamic State

The terrorist group’s most vulnerable victims are also its future face.

Maia Sandu, the winner of the recent election, wearing a face mask as she casts her ballot at a polling station during the second round of Moldova's presidential election in Chisinau, Moldova on Nov. 15, amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

Moldova’s Election Result Is a Blow to Russia’s Regional Dominance

The victory of the pro-Western politician Maia Sandu shows Putin is losing his grip over Russia’s near abroad.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry holds his granddaughter for the signing of the accord at the United Nations Signing Ceremony for the Paris Agreement  climate change accord that came out of negotiations at the COP21 climate summit last December in Paris. on April 22, 2016 in New York City.

Biden Puts White House on Climate War Footing

The appointment of John Kerry as presidential climate envoy signals a desire to pull in allies and adversaries in the climate change fight.

Secretary of State-designate Antony Blinken

Antony Blinken’s Wonk Rock Is Everything a D.C. Dad Could Dream Of

What hidden messages are there in these sultry hits from the likely next U.S. secretary of state?

Vice-President Joe Biden looks on during a bilateral meeting between President Obama and President Petro Poroshenko of Ukraine in the Oval Office of the White House September 18, 2014 in Washington.

Biden Has the Team Obama Always Wanted

The next U.S. administration will feature the most cohesive group of foreign-policy hands in at least a generation.

Firefighters set a backfire to protect homes in California

Indian and Californian Politics Are Both Playing With Fire

Environmental crisis has become caught up in petty struggles.

Democratic vice presidential candidate U.S. Senator Joe Biden (D-DE) reads an article from "USA Today" during a rally at Morrell Park October 17, 2008 in Henderson, Nevada.

The Transition Has Started. Release the Op-Eds!

Every four years, Washington’s ideas industry indulges in its favorite ritual: trying—and mostly failing—to influence the next U.S. president.

A group of Nigerians repatriated from South Africa

‘Put South Africa First’ Breeds Hate Toward Other Africans

Anti-foreigner sentiments are growing against Nigerians like me.

US President Donald Trump speaks to members of the US military following a meeting at the Pentagon in Washington, DC, July 20, 2017.

Trump’s Pentagon Now Vetting Nonpolitical Experts

Political-style vetting is now being applied to special government employees and other hard-to-find outside experts.

People walk in front of Ethiopian flags marking the new Ethiopian Millennium on Sept. 10, 2007 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Ethiopia’s Government and the TPLF Leadership Are Not Morally Equivalent

The leaders of the Tigray People’s Liberation Front are seeking to manipulate the international community into backing a power-sharing deal.

View of the Peace Monument outside the headquarters of Venezuelan state-owned oil company PDVSA in Caracas on April 22.

Is OPEC Over?

After 60 years, the organization is struggling to weather the pandemic and peak oil—but there is a way forward.

In the Magazine

In the Magazine

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The Most Important Election. Ever.

Why the fate of the American republic—and the world—could depend on what happens Nov. 3.

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A Perilous Presidential Handoff

The presidential transition of power has long been a weakness of the U.S. political system. But never more so than now.

The Real Hacking Threat

It doesn’t matter if Russia actually sways the vote. What matters is whether Americans think it did.

Emerging Stronger From the Great Lockdown

The managing director and the chief economist of the International Monetary Fund lay out a strategy for sustained recovery.

Veterans and service men and women hold a press conference outside the U.S. capitol to demand justice for Vanessa Guillen, who was killed by a fellow soldier stationed in Texas, in Washington, DC on July 21.

Can Biden Make the Military Safe for Those Who Serve?

Female and LGBTQ soldiers may face more danger from their colleagues than their enemies. Here’s what the president-elect can do.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi waits for the arrival of Nepalese Prime Minister K.P. Sharma Oli for a ceremonial reception at the Indian presidential house in New Delhi on April 7, 2018.

Why India Refused to Join the World’s Biggest Trading Bloc

New Delhi chose protectionism over the RCEP. History suggests it made the wrong call.

Micah Cohen, Nate Silver, and Harry Enten

Polling Has a 98 Percent Chance of Being Bad for You

It’s not the accuracy of the polls that matters, it’s their ubiquity.

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

Secret Flight Shows Netanyahu and Mohammed bin Salman Joining to Face Biden

One thing is clear: The two leaders are bracing for an ill wind emanating from the new White House.

Voices

Saudi and foreign media representatives listen to Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman remotely addressing a press conference, at the G20 summit's Media Center in the capital Riyadh, on November 22, 2020.

Mohammed bin Salman’s Human Rights Mirage

Saudi Arabia’s recent social reforms are more about earning international attention than improving the lives of its citizens at home.

Vice President Joe Biden greets guests as he and his wife Dr. Jill Biden host a Thanksgiving dinner at the Vice-President's residence.

The Top Five Reasons to Still Feel Thankful About the World

Believe it or not, this year’s pandemic-afflicted globe offers plenty of grounds for gratitude.

A copy of former President George Washington's personal copy of the Constitution and Bill of Rights is viewed at Christie's auction house on June 15, 2012 in New York City.

This Is How a Constitution Dies

The United States’ stalled presidential transition may seem like a farce—but it’s still the biggest constitutional crisis since the Civil War.

President Donald Trump walks with Jerome Powell at the White House in Washington on Nov. 2, 2017.

The West’s Constitutional Crises Threaten the Economy’s Last Best Hope

Central banks have kept their economies afloat this year—but political dysfunction is pushing them past the breaking point.

A FOCUS ON RACE AND FOREIGN POLICY

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Why Is Mainstream International Relations Blind to Racism?

Ignoring the central role of race and colonialism in world affairs precludes an accurate understanding of the modern state system.

Black Lives Matter Protest London

When Did Racism Become Solely a Domestic Issue?

International relations theorists once explored racism. What has the field lost by giving that up?

Then-Libyan leader Muammar al-Qaddafi (R) speaks with presidents Jacob Zuma of South Africa (L) and Denis Sassou Nguesso of Republic of Congo (C) in Tripoli on April 10, 2011 during a meeting with a high-ranking African Union delegation trying to negotiate a truce between Qaddafi's forces and rebels seeking to oust him.

By Ignoring African Leaders, the West Paved the Way for Chaos in Libya

A race-based colonial mindset that views the continent as Europe’s playground and dismisses the concerns of Africans continues to fuel death and destruction.

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Why Race Matters in International Relations

Western dominance and white privilege permeate the field. It’s time to change that.

Special insights on the post-pandemic world

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Culture Shock

Eight voices on the future of entertainment, culture, and sports.

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The Future of Travel

Seven predictions for how tourism will change.

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Will Schools and Universities Ever Return to Normal?

Nine experts on the future of education after the pandemic.

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The Future of the State

Ten leading global thinkers on government after the pandemic.

visual stories

Former vice president and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden delivers remarks in the pouring rain during a drive-in event in Tampa, Florida, on Oct. 29. JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images

The Month in World Photos

October brought the U.S. president’s coronavirus diagnosis and continued fighting between Armenia and Azerbaijan—plus the shooting of peaceful protesters in Nigeria, a busy election season on both sides of the world, and massive flooding in Vietnam.

Dionicio Ortega, 55, and Juana Maldonado, 50, the parents of Claudio Ortega Maldonado, a Mexican immigrant who died of COVID-19 while living in New York City on April 22, look out over the village of Tlapa de Comonfort, Mexico, on Aug. 29.

The Coronavirus Is Now Another Risk of U.S. Migration

At least 2,500 Mexicans in the United States, many of them essential workers, have died from COVID-19. Back home in Mexico, their grieving families are left without support.