Karl Rove’s dream voter

Britney Spears has waded into the deep areas of kissing Madonna and the war with Iraq in an interview with Crossfire‘s Tucker Carlson. Let me just reprint this Yahoo! Launch story in full: In a truly bizarre interview pairing, pop princess Britney Spears sat down for an interview Wednesday (September 3) with CNN’s conservative political ...

By , a professor of international politics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University.

Britney Spears has waded into the deep areas of kissing Madonna and the war with Iraq in an interview with Crossfire's Tucker Carlson. Let me just reprint this Yahoo! Launch story in full:
In a truly bizarre interview pairing, pop princess Britney Spears sat down for an interview Wednesday (September 3) with CNN's conservative political pundit Tucker Carlson. Wearing what appeared to be a blonde wig with red streaks, and chomping on a piece of gum, Spears answered questions ranging from her now-infamous kiss with Madonna, to her view of the war in Iraq. The youthful-looking Carlson, wearing his trademark bow-tie, asked Spears about the kiss with Madonna onstage last week during MTV's Music Video Awards show. Spears said, "I didn't know it was going to be that long and everything," explaining that during rehearsal Madonna had told her they'd just play it by ear during the performance. She also said that she'd never kissed a woman before, and wouldn't again--unless it's Madonna. Carlson then steered the interview to politics, asking Spears if she'd supported the war in Iraq. Spears answered, "Honestly, I think we should just trust our president in every decision that he makes and we should just support that." She declared that she trusts President Bush, but when asked about the president's political future, Spears told Carlson that she doesn't know if he'll get re-elected. (emphasis added)
Now, I've supported the president on multiple policy fronts, but doesn't this seem a bit too.... er.... bubblegum as a form of political participation? I mean, compared to her advanced work in semiconductor physics, this is a bit of a letdown in intellectual quality. Still, if I'm Karl Rove, I'm arranging a photo-op ASAP.

Britney Spears has waded into the deep areas of kissing Madonna and the war with Iraq in an interview with Crossfire‘s Tucker Carlson. Let me just reprint this Yahoo! Launch story in full:

In a truly bizarre interview pairing, pop princess Britney Spears sat down for an interview Wednesday (September 3) with CNN’s conservative political pundit Tucker Carlson. Wearing what appeared to be a blonde wig with red streaks, and chomping on a piece of gum, Spears answered questions ranging from her now-infamous kiss with Madonna, to her view of the war in Iraq. The youthful-looking Carlson, wearing his trademark bow-tie, asked Spears about the kiss with Madonna onstage last week during MTV’s Music Video Awards show. Spears said, “I didn’t know it was going to be that long and everything,” explaining that during rehearsal Madonna had told her they’d just play it by ear during the performance. She also said that she’d never kissed a woman before, and wouldn’t again–unless it’s Madonna. Carlson then steered the interview to politics, asking Spears if she’d supported the war in Iraq. Spears answered, “Honestly, I think we should just trust our president in every decision that he makes and we should just support that.” She declared that she trusts President Bush, but when asked about the president’s political future, Spears told Carlson that she doesn’t know if he’ll get re-elected. (emphasis added)

Now, I’ve supported the president on multiple policy fronts, but doesn’t this seem a bit too…. er…. bubblegum as a form of political participation? I mean, compared to her advanced work in semiconductor physics, this is a bit of a letdown in intellectual quality. Still, if I’m Karl Rove, I’m arranging a photo-op ASAP.

Daniel W. Drezner is a professor of international politics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University, where he is the co-director of the Russia and Eurasia Program. Twitter: @dandrezner

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