Charles Krauthammer misses the best part

On Friday Krauthammer penned a column about how the Washington Nationals have rekindled his passion for baseball. What happened to it before? Naturally, he was a Red Sox fan: Then came the 1986 World Series and the Great Buckner Collapse. At that point, I figured I’d suffered enough. I got a divorce. Amicable, but still ...

By , a professor of international politics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University and co-host of the Space the Nation podcast.

On Friday Krauthammer penned a column about how the Washington Nationals have rekindled his passion for baseball. What happened to it before? Naturally, he was a Red Sox fan:

On Friday Krauthammer penned a column about how the Washington Nationals have rekindled his passion for baseball. What happened to it before? Naturally, he was a Red Sox fan:

Then came the 1986 World Series and the Great Buckner Collapse. At that point, I figured I’d suffered enough. I got a divorce. Amicable, but still a divorce. With a prodigious act of will, I resolved to follow the Sox — but at an enforced distance. I refused to live or die with them. Which is how I got through Grady’s Blunder — leaving Pedro in too long — in Game 7 of the 2003 Red Sox-Yankees playoff. It was a hard fall for Sox fans, but I came through it beautifully — feeling delighted, indeed somewhat superior, at my partial emancipation from the irrationality of fandom (far more troubling than the pain). Thus a free man, almost purged of all allegiance, I watched with near-indifference as the Montreal Expos moved to Washington. Little did I know.

I know this is a lighter column for Krauthammer, but it’s almost criminally negligent for him to go from discussing his passion for the Sox to his interest in the Nats without mentioning how he felt being on the outside looking in at the Red Sox successful 2004 season.

Daniel W. Drezner is a professor of international politics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University and co-host of the Space the Nation podcast. Twitter: @dandrezner

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