In honor of Justice Rehnquist….

Anyone attempting to earn a Ph.D. is familiar with Matt Groening’s Life is Hell strip about graduate school. Patricularly this part: bitter.gif In honor of Chief Justice William Rehnquist’s contrarian announcement that he’s staying on for a while, I thought it worth reprinting this fact from Charles Lane’s profile of Rehnquist in the July/August 2005 ...

By , a professor of international politics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University.
590305_29617314_bitter2.gif
590305_29617314_bitter2.gif

Anyone attempting to earn a Ph.D. is familiar with Matt Groening's Life is Hell strip about graduate school. Patricularly this part:

In honor of Chief Justice William Rehnquist's contrarian announcement that he's staying on for a while, I thought it worth reprinting this fact from Charles Lane's profile of Rehnquist in the July/August 2005 issue of Stanford magazine:

Applying credits earned at Kenyon and diligently working through the summers, Rehnquist picked up his bachelor?s and master?s degrees in political science in 1948. Then he left for Harvard, where [his undergraduate mentor Charles] Fairman had studied, with the idea of gaining a PhD in government. But something about Cambridge did not agree with him. Perhaps it was the cold weather; perhaps it was the liberal politics of what detractors called ?the Kremlin on the Charles.? ?I remember him saying he did not like Harvard, and he did not like political science,? says Craig Bradley, a professor of law at Indiana University who clerked for Rehnquist in the court?s 1975-76 term. ?He didn?t think much of the professoriate.? Bradley says Rehnquist saw academics generally as ?liberal blatherers.? By the fall of 1949, he was back at Stanford, enrolled at law school.

Anyone attempting to earn a Ph.D. is familiar with Matt Groening’s Life is Hell strip about graduate school. Patricularly this part:

bitter.gif

bitter.gif

In honor of Chief Justice William Rehnquist’s contrarian announcement that he’s staying on for a while, I thought it worth reprinting this fact from Charles Lane’s profile of Rehnquist in the July/August 2005 issue of Stanford magazine:

Applying credits earned at Kenyon and diligently working through the summers, Rehnquist picked up his bachelor?s and master?s degrees in political science in 1948. Then he left for Harvard, where [his undergraduate mentor Charles] Fairman had studied, with the idea of gaining a PhD in government. But something about Cambridge did not agree with him. Perhaps it was the cold weather; perhaps it was the liberal politics of what detractors called ?the Kremlin on the Charles.? ?I remember him saying he did not like Harvard, and he did not like political science,? says Craig Bradley, a professor of law at Indiana University who clerked for Rehnquist in the court?s 1975-76 term. ?He didn?t think much of the professoriate.? Bradley says Rehnquist saw academics generally as ?liberal blatherers.? By the fall of 1949, he was back at Stanford, enrolled at law school.

Readers should feel free to speculate on how history would have changed had the Harvard Government department not been as hostile an environment to Rehnquist.

Daniel W. Drezner is a professor of international politics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University, where he is the co-director of the Russia and Eurasia Program. Twitter: @dandrezner

Tag: Law

More from Foreign Policy

An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.
An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.

Is Cold War Inevitable?

A new biography of George Kennan, the father of containment, raises questions about whether the old Cold War—and the emerging one with China—could have been avoided.

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.
U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.

So You Want to Buy an Ambassadorship

The United States is the only Western government that routinely rewards mega-donors with top diplomatic posts.

Chinese President Xi jinping  toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.
Chinese President Xi jinping toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.

Can China Pull Off Its Charm Offensive?

Why Beijing’s foreign-policy reset will—or won’t—work out.

Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.
Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.

Turkey’s Problem Isn’t Sweden. It’s the United States.

Erdogan has focused on Stockholm’s stance toward Kurdish exile groups, but Ankara’s real demand is the end of U.S. support for Kurds in Syria.