Condi leaves men “powerless in her wake”

Elizabeth Day of Britain’s Daily Telegraph wants to know: “Why does Ms Rice hold this strange, intoxicating power?” Just read these excerpts from her story on Secretary Rice’s visit to Blackburn: Ms Rice greeted it all with a red-lipsticked smile and a heady wallop of fragrance that seems to have left grown men powerless in ...

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608352_condi8.jpg

Elizabeth Day of Britain's Daily Telegraph wants to know: "Why does Ms Rice hold this strange, intoxicating power?" Just read these excerpts from her story on Secretary Rice's visit to Blackburn: Ms Rice greeted it all with a red-lipsticked smile and a heady wallop of fragrance that seems to have left grown men powerless in her wake. In her presence, the normally buttoned-up Mr Straw alternated between looking like a proud father bringing his daughter into the office for work experience and an adolescent schoolboy with a hopeless crush on the head girl. I was against the war, but I think she's wonderful," gushed Stephen Walsh, 47, a human resources consultant, who had wrestled himself to the front of the security cordon outside Blackburn town hall in the hope of catching a glimpse. "She's a fantastic role model when you think about the background she came from. Of course, she's very fanciable as well. I think it's the power thing. She's an attractive woman, and that's not just about the way she looks." "I want to ask her how she gets her hair to stay so smooth. Mine always goes frizzy in the rain. Hers was lovely and straight when she walked into the town hall."

Elizabeth Day of Britain’s Daily Telegraph wants to know: “Why does Ms Rice hold this strange, intoxicating power?” Just read these excerpts from her story on Secretary Rice’s visit to Blackburn:

  • Ms Rice greeted it all with a red-lipsticked smile and a heady wallop of fragrance that seems to have left grown men powerless in her wake.
  • In her presence, the normally buttoned-up Mr Straw alternated between looking like a proud father bringing his daughter into the office for work experience and an adolescent schoolboy with a hopeless crush on the head girl.
  • I was against the war, but I think she’s wonderful,” gushed Stephen Walsh, 47, a human resources consultant, who had wrestled himself to the front of the security cordon outside Blackburn town hall in the hope of catching a glimpse. “She’s a fantastic role model when you think about the background she came from. Of course, she’s very fanciable as well. I think it’s the power thing. She’s an attractive woman, and that’s not just about the way she looks.”
  • “I want to ask her how she gets her hair to stay so smooth. Mine always goes frizzy in the rain. Hers was lovely and straight when she walked into the town hall.”

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