Scowcroft on how to handle Iran

In my haste to highlight the importance of Nigeria in this morning’s brief, I overlooked a good item on Iran. Brent Scowcroft took to the editorial pages of the Australian to argue “Don’t Get Belligerent About Iran.” He writes: The five permanent members of the UN Security Council should be prepared to make the following ...

608876_scowcroft.thumbnail5.jpg
608876_scowcroft.thumbnail5.jpg

In my haste to highlight the importance of Nigeria in this morning's brief, I overlooked a good item on Iran.

Brent Scowcroft took to the editorial pages of the Australian to argue "Don't Get Belligerent About Iran." He writes:

The five permanent members of the UN Security Council should be prepared to make the following offer to Iran. Acknowledging that Tehran has every right to exploit nuclear energy for civilian use, Iran should be guaranteed an adequate supply of nuclear fuel for its reactors in return for abiding by all International Atomic Energy Agency regulations. This, in turn, should serve as the basis for a new international fuel-cycle regime that applies to all countries. Any approach to stemming nuclear proliferation that singles out specific countries - such as the Bush administration is doing with Iran - is not likely to succeed.

In my haste to highlight the importance of Nigeria in this morning’s brief, I overlooked a good item on Iran.

Brent Scowcroft took to the editorial pages of the Australian to argue “Don’t Get Belligerent About Iran.” He writes:

The five permanent members of the UN Security Council should be prepared to make the following offer to Iran. Acknowledging that Tehran has every right to exploit nuclear energy for civilian use, Iran should be guaranteed an adequate supply of nuclear fuel for its reactors in return for abiding by all International Atomic Energy Agency regulations. This, in turn, should serve as the basis for a new international fuel-cycle regime that applies to all countries. Any approach to stemming nuclear proliferation that singles out specific countries – such as the Bush administration is doing with Iran – is not likely to succeed.

More details about this approach appear in the story. Gerard Baker notes on Real Clear Politics that Washington faces a “coalition of the unwilling” on Iran.

Via Daniel Drezner, I also encountered Mark Steyn’s essay in the City Journal on Facing Down Iran. Not sure of it’s value to the debate just yet, but it seems like something hawkish to read if you have the time this weekend. Probably too long(winded) to tackle at work. 

More from Foreign Policy

A Panzerhaubitze 2000 tank howitzer fires during a mission in Ukraine’s Donetsk region.
A Panzerhaubitze 2000 tank howitzer fires during a mission in Ukraine’s Donetsk region.

Lessons for the Next War

Twelve experts weigh in on how to prevent, deter, and—if necessary—fight the next conflict.

An illustration showing a torn Russian flag and Russian President Vladimir Putin.
An illustration showing a torn Russian flag and Russian President Vladimir Putin.

It’s High Time to Prepare for Russia’s Collapse

Not planning for the possibility of disintegration betrays a dangerous lack of imagination.

An unexploded tail section of a cluster bomb is seen in Ukraine.
An unexploded tail section of a cluster bomb is seen in Ukraine.

Turkey Is Sending Cold War-Era Cluster Bombs to Ukraine

The artillery-fired cluster munitions could be lethal to Russian troops—and Ukrainian civilians.

A joint session of Congress meets to count the Electoral College vote from the 2008 presidential election the House Chamber in the U.S. Capitol  January 8, 2009 in Washington.
A joint session of Congress meets to count the Electoral College vote from the 2008 presidential election the House Chamber in the U.S. Capitol January 8, 2009 in Washington.

Congrats, You’re a Member of Congress. Now Listen Up.

Some brief foreign-policy advice for the newest members of the U.S. legislature.