File under: Pope still Catholic

Everyone knows that the World Cup that gets under way in just three days is the most anticipated global sporting event since, well, the 2002 World Cup. Everyone, that is, except those of us in the U.S. of A. According to a recent poll by public opinion research firm Global Market Insite, only 44 percent of ...

608413_fifa5.jpg
608413_fifa5.jpg

Everyone knows that the World Cup that gets under way in just three days is the most anticipated global sporting event since, well, the 2002 World Cup. Everyone, that is, except those of us in the U.S. of A. According to a recent poll by public opinion research firm Global Market Insite, only 44 percent of Americans polled could name the country where the revelry will take place (psst--it's Germany).   

I hate to pile on to reports that reveal how distanced Americans are from the rest of the world, including an excellent one in the current issue of FP. But am I the only one who thinks 44 percent seems kind of high? I can't wait to see the breathless CNN reports about how many Germans aren't following the upcoming NBA Finals, despite hometown boy Dirk Nowitzki's first appearance. Oh wait, that probably won't ever happen. 

Ok, needless jingoism aside, the GMI poll taken in 12 countries does have some great information and graphics, including this one, which points out that as many as 27 percent of respondents are planning to use holiday or sick time to watch the games. Which is great for us Americans, who can use the time that we won't be taking off to catch up to the rest of the world in science, math, foreign languages, and so on. 

Everyone knows that the World Cup that gets under way in just three days is the most anticipated global sporting event since, well, the 2002 World Cup. Everyone, that is, except those of us in the U.S. of A. According to a recent poll by public opinion research firm Global Market Insite, only 44 percent of Americans polled could name the country where the revelry will take place (psst–it’s Germany).   

I hate to pile on to reports that reveal how distanced Americans are from the rest of the world, including an excellent one in the current issue of FP. But am I the only one who thinks 44 percent seems kind of high? I can’t wait to see the breathless CNN reports about how many Germans aren’t following the upcoming NBA Finals, despite hometown boy Dirk Nowitzki’s first appearance. Oh wait, that probably won’t ever happen. 

Ok, needless jingoism aside, the GMI poll taken in 12 countries does have some great information and graphics, including this one, which points out that as many as 27 percent of respondents are planning to use holiday or sick time to watch the games. Which is great for us Americans, who can use the time that we won’t be taking off to catch up to the rest of the world in science, math, foreign languages, and so on. 

Kate Palmer is deputy managing editor at Foreign Policy.

More from Foreign Policy

An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.
An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.

Is Cold War Inevitable?

A new biography of George Kennan, the father of containment, raises questions about whether the old Cold War—and the emerging one with China—could have been avoided.

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.
U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.

So You Want to Buy an Ambassadorship

The United States is the only Western government that routinely rewards mega-donors with top diplomatic posts.

Chinese President Xi jinping  toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.
Chinese President Xi jinping toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.

Can China Pull Off Its Charm Offensive?

Why Beijing’s foreign-policy reset will—or won’t—work out.

Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.
Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.

Turkey’s Problem Isn’t Sweden. It’s the United States.

Erdogan has focused on Stockholm’s stance toward Kurdish exile groups, but Ankara’s real demand is the end of U.S. support for Kurds in Syria.