Red cards and red-light girls

Germany legalized prostitution in 2002, so there’s been widespread speculation that World Cup fans visiting the country will be doing a little scoring of their own, albeit off the pitch. The major concern: Women being trafficked into Germany – many against their will – for that express purpose. Bordellos are also drawing the ire of ...

607967_Brothel5.jpg
607967_Brothel5.jpg
BERLIN - MAY 16: German escort girl Jaqueline awaits customers at Berlin's exclusive Night Club Bel Ami on May 16, 2006 in Berlin, Germany. Escort girls across Germany are anticipating booming business in June as soccer fans from around the world will descend upon the country for the World Cup. (Photo by Andreas Rentz/Getty Images)

Germany legalized prostitution in 2002, so there's been widespread speculation that World Cup fans visiting the country will be doing a little scoring of their own, albeit off the pitch. The major concern: Women being trafficked into Germany - many against their will - for that express purpose. Bordellos are also drawing the ire of fans from Muslim countries; one brothel that flew the flag of Saudi Arabia and Iran received bomb threats. So in a ForeignPolicy.com exclusive, Berlin-based journalist Andrew Curry takes us inside the German sex trade for a look at the heated debate over trafficking and legal ladies of the night.

Germany legalized prostitution in 2002, so there’s been widespread speculation that World Cup fans visiting the country will be doing a little scoring of their own, albeit off the pitch. The major concern: Women being trafficked into Germany – many against their will – for that express purpose. Bordellos are also drawing the ire of fans from Muslim countries; one brothel that flew the flag of Saudi Arabia and Iran received bomb threats. So in a ForeignPolicy.com exclusive, Berlin-based journalist Andrew Curry takes us inside the German sex trade for a look at the heated debate over trafficking and legal ladies of the night.

Carolyn O'Hara is a senior editor at Foreign Policy.

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