Going to Graceland

When Japanese PM Junichiro Koizumi comes to the US later this month, he can look forward to peanut butter and banana sandwiches. Bush is escorting Koizumi, who’s apparently the biggest Elvis fan to ever lead a country, to Graceland aboard Air Force One. The pilgrimage makes sense: Koizumi shares a birthday with the King, his ...

608291_KoizumiCD5.jpg
608291_KoizumiCD5.jpg

When Japanese PM Junichiro Koizumi comes to the US later this month, he can look forward to peanut butter and banana sandwiches. Bush is escorting Koizumi, who's apparently the biggest Elvis fan to ever lead a country, to Graceland aboard Air Force One. The pilgrimage makes sense: Koizumi shares a birthday with the King, his brother ran a chapter of Presley's fan club, he often sings along to Elvis songs at official dinners, and he released a CD for charity entitled "My Favorite Elvis Songs." Given that devotion, you'd think he'd have visited Memphis before. Well, perhaps so many times it's embarrassing:

"This is his first time visiting Graceland as prime minister," a Japanese Embassy spokesman said. "I cannot confirm that he hasn't been there before."

In other news, the Chinese are all shook up over Koizumi's upcoming red-carpet treatment. 

When Japanese PM Junichiro Koizumi comes to the US later this month, he can look forward to peanut butter and banana sandwiches. Bush is escorting Koizumi, who’s apparently the biggest Elvis fan to ever lead a country, to Graceland aboard Air Force One. The pilgrimage makes sense: Koizumi shares a birthday with the King, his brother ran a chapter of Presley’s fan club, he often sings along to Elvis songs at official dinners, and he released a CD for charity entitled “My Favorite Elvis Songs.” Given that devotion, you’d think he’d have visited Memphis before. Well, perhaps so many times it’s embarrassing:

“This is his first time visiting Graceland as prime minister,” a Japanese Embassy spokesman said. “I cannot confirm that he hasn’t been there before.”

In other news, the Chinese are all shook up over Koizumi’s upcoming red-carpet treatment. 

Carolyn O'Hara is a senior editor at Foreign Policy.

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