If Steve King builds it, they won’t come

Think building an impermeable wall along the U.S.-Mexico border is a pipe dream? Not so, says Rep. Steve King (R-IA). In fact, he’s “designed” one of his own. King grew up in what he calls a “law enforcement family.” So he presumably knows a thing or two about illegality. And Tuesday, when he took to the House ...

607871_king8.jpg
607871_king8.jpg

Think building an impermeable wall along the U.S.-Mexico border is a pipe dream? Not so, says Rep. Steve King (R-IA). In fact, he's "designed" one of his own. King grew up in what he calls a "law enforcement family." So he presumably knows a thing or two about illegality. And Tuesday, when he took to the House floor to talk about immigration - the illegal kind - King carried with him a model of the wall he has engineered, presumably in his spare time. Reports The Hill:

But it got really interesting when King broke out the mock electrical wiring: "I also say we need to do a few other things on top of that wall, and one of them being to put a little bit of wire on top here to provide a disincentive for people to climb over the top."

He added, "We could also electrify this wire with the kind of current that would not kill somebody, but it would be a discouragement for them to be fooling around with it. We do that with livestock all the time."

Think building an impermeable wall along the U.S.-Mexico border is a pipe dream? Not so, says Rep. Steve King (R-IA). In fact, he’s “designed” one of his own. King grew up in what he calls a “law enforcement family.” So he presumably knows a thing or two about illegality. And Tuesday, when he took to the House floor to talk about immigration – the illegal kind – King carried with him a model of the wall he has engineered, presumably in his spare time. Reports The Hill:

But it got really interesting when King broke out the mock electrical wiring: “I also say we need to do a few other things on top of that wall, and one of them being to put a little bit of wire on top here to provide a disincentive for people to climb over the top.”

He added, “We could also electrify this wire with the kind of current that would not kill somebody, but it would be a discouragement for them to be fooling around with it. We do that with livestock all the time.”

 

 

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