Fair, balanced, and kicking butt

With reports that war footage from Lebanon is popular on websites such as YouTube.com, and a huge variety of English-language versions of Hebrew and Arabic newspapers reporting out of Israel, Gaza, and Lebanon, Americans certainly have their pick when it comes to coverage of events in the Middle East. So where do millions of Americans, after ...

607706_BillOReilly5.jpg
607706_BillOReilly5.jpg

With reports that war footage from Lebanon is popular on websites such as YouTube.com, and a huge variety of English-language versions of Hebrew and Arabic newspapers reporting out of Israel, Gaza, and Lebanon, Americans certainly have their pick when it comes to coverage of events in the Middle East. So where do millions of Americans, after a long day at work, get their news on the Middle East? From Bill O'Reilly, of course.

Fox News swept the top 20 spots for cable news ratings this past week during coverage of the crisis. One episode of The O'Reilly Factor was seen by more people than 2.6 million people - slightly higher than the circulation of USA Today, America's most-widely read daily newspaper. Fox's numbers blow away their TV rivals CNN and MSNBC by even wider margins. Up against O'Reilly, CNN's Paula Zahn could only eek out an average of 871,000 viewers.

With reports that war footage from Lebanon is popular on websites such as YouTube.com, and a huge variety of English-language versions of Hebrew and Arabic newspapers reporting out of Israel, Gaza, and Lebanon, Americans certainly have their pick when it comes to coverage of events in the Middle East. So where do millions of Americans, after a long day at work, get their news on the Middle East? From Bill O’Reilly, of course.

Fox News swept the top 20 spots for cable news ratings this past week during coverage of the crisis. One episode of The O’Reilly Factor was seen by more people than 2.6 million people – slightly higher than the circulation of USA Today, America’s most-widely read daily newspaper. Fox’s numbers blow away their TV rivals CNN and MSNBC by even wider margins. Up against O’Reilly, CNN’s Paula Zahn could only eek out an average of 871,000 viewers.

More from Foreign Policy

A Panzerhaubitze 2000 tank howitzer fires during a mission in Ukraine’s Donetsk region.
A Panzerhaubitze 2000 tank howitzer fires during a mission in Ukraine’s Donetsk region.

Lessons for the Next War

Twelve experts weigh in on how to prevent, deter, and—if necessary—fight the next conflict.

An illustration showing a torn Russian flag and Russian President Vladimir Putin.
An illustration showing a torn Russian flag and Russian President Vladimir Putin.

It’s High Time to Prepare for Russia’s Collapse

Not planning for the possibility of disintegration betrays a dangerous lack of imagination.

An unexploded tail section of a cluster bomb is seen in Ukraine.
An unexploded tail section of a cluster bomb is seen in Ukraine.

Turkey Is Sending Cold War-Era Cluster Bombs to Ukraine

The artillery-fired cluster munitions could be lethal to Russian troops—and Ukrainian civilians.

A joint session of Congress meets to count the Electoral College vote from the 2008 presidential election the House Chamber in the U.S. Capitol  January 8, 2009 in Washington.
A joint session of Congress meets to count the Electoral College vote from the 2008 presidential election the House Chamber in the U.S. Capitol January 8, 2009 in Washington.

Congrats, You’re a Member of Congress. Now Listen Up.

Some brief foreign-policy advice for the newest members of the U.S. legislature.