Psychological warfare

It’s not too often that psychologists makes headlines in the war on terror, but the American Psychological Association better think up a press strategy of its own – and soon. As Salon.com reports, the 150,000-strong professional organization will likely face a noisy internal revolt next month at its annual meeting in New Orleans, where outraged members ...

607709_guantanamo.thumbnail5.jpg
607709_guantanamo.thumbnail5.jpg

It's not too often that psychologists makes headlines in the war on terror, but the American Psychological Association better think up a press strategy of its own - and soon. As Salon.com reports, the 150,000-strong professional organization will likely face a noisy internal revolt next month at its annual meeting in New Orleans, where outraged members of the organization plan to make a clamor over APA guidelines that condone members' participation in Guantanamo-style interrogations of terror suspects.

The controversy over the year-old guidelines is certain to grow with the revelation that six of the 10 psychologists who drafted the guidelines apparently have ties to the military. Some APA members are crying foul, claiming that the drafters' military positions led them to compromise their commitments as psychologists, whose job it is to heal people, not help inflict trauma. It's sure to be an interesting fight.

It’s not too often that psychologists makes headlines in the war on terror, but the American Psychological Association better think up a press strategy of its own – and soon. As Salon.com reports, the 150,000-strong professional organization will likely face a noisy internal revolt next month at its annual meeting in New Orleans, where outraged members of the organization plan to make a clamor over APA guidelines that condone members’ participation in Guantanamo-style interrogations of terror suspects.

The controversy over the year-old guidelines is certain to grow with the revelation that six of the 10 psychologists who drafted the guidelines apparently have ties to the military. Some APA members are crying foul, claiming that the drafters’ military positions led them to compromise their commitments as psychologists, whose job it is to heal people, not help inflict trauma. It’s sure to be an interesting fight.

Ben Fryer is a researcher at Foreign Policy.

More from Foreign Policy

A Panzerhaubitze 2000 tank howitzer fires during a mission in Ukraine’s Donetsk region.
A Panzerhaubitze 2000 tank howitzer fires during a mission in Ukraine’s Donetsk region.

Lessons for the Next War

Twelve experts weigh in on how to prevent, deter, and—if necessary—fight the next conflict.

An illustration showing a torn Russian flag and Russian President Vladimir Putin.
An illustration showing a torn Russian flag and Russian President Vladimir Putin.

It’s High Time to Prepare for Russia’s Collapse

Not planning for the possibility of disintegration betrays a dangerous lack of imagination.

An unexploded tail section of a cluster bomb is seen in Ukraine.
An unexploded tail section of a cluster bomb is seen in Ukraine.

Turkey Is Sending Cold War-Era Cluster Bombs to Ukraine

The artillery-fired cluster munitions could be lethal to Russian troops—and Ukrainian civilians.

A joint session of Congress meets to count the Electoral College vote from the 2008 presidential election the House Chamber in the U.S. Capitol  January 8, 2009 in Washington.
A joint session of Congress meets to count the Electoral College vote from the 2008 presidential election the House Chamber in the U.S. Capitol January 8, 2009 in Washington.

Congrats, You’re a Member of Congress. Now Listen Up.

Some brief foreign-policy advice for the newest members of the U.S. legislature.