Glacier beer hits the market

People looking for a silver lining to global warming can now find solace in alcohol – glacier beer, to be precise. The world’s first Inuit microbrewery has started producing frosty ales using water melted from Greenland’s mammoth ice cap. The maker of Icecap Beer, located 390 miles south of the Arctic Circle, claims that using 2,000 year-old ice makes for ...

607635_beer.thumbnail5.gif
607635_beer.thumbnail5.gif

People looking for a silver lining to global warming can now find solace in alcohol - glacier beer, to be precise. The world's first Inuit microbrewery has started producing frosty ales using water melted from Greenland's mammoth ice cap. The maker of Icecap Beer, located 390 miles south of the Arctic Circle, claims that using 2,000 year-old ice makes for a softer, cleaner-tasting beer. 

For now, would-be imbibers will have to travel to Denmark to find the stuff, since it's not yet available in other markets. But that could soon change as the company expands operations and as the chief ingredient - ice water - becomes more plentiful. And since some reports suggest that the great thaw of Greenland may be happening faster than anticipated, that can only mean one thing - well, aside from higher sea levels: more beer.

People looking for a silver lining to global warming can now find solace in alcohol – glacier beer, to be precise. The world’s first Inuit microbrewery has started producing frosty ales using water melted from Greenland’s mammoth ice cap. The maker of Icecap Beer, located 390 miles south of the Arctic Circle, claims that using 2,000 year-old ice makes for a softer, cleaner-tasting beer. 

For now, would-be imbibers will have to travel to Denmark to find the stuff, since it’s not yet available in other markets. But that could soon change as the company expands operations and as the chief ingredient – ice water – becomes more plentiful. And since some reports suggest that the great thaw of Greenland may be happening faster than anticipated, that can only mean one thing – well, aside from higher sea levels: more beer.

Ben Fryer is a researcher at Foreign Policy.

More from Foreign Policy

An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.
An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.

Is Cold War Inevitable?

A new biography of George Kennan, the father of containment, raises questions about whether the old Cold War—and the emerging one with China—could have been avoided.

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.
U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.

So You Want to Buy an Ambassadorship

The United States is the only Western government that routinely rewards mega-donors with top diplomatic posts.

Chinese President Xi jinping  toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.
Chinese President Xi jinping toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.

Can China Pull Off Its Charm Offensive?

Why Beijing’s foreign-policy reset will—or won’t—work out.

Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.
Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.

Turkey’s Problem Isn’t Sweden. It’s the United States.

Erdogan has focused on Stockholm’s stance toward Kurdish exile groups, but Ankara’s real demand is the end of U.S. support for Kurds in Syria.