Toons in the DoD

Did you know that we have cartoon characters working for the military? We mean that literally (although it’s perhaps figuratively true too). Neither did we, until we stumbled across this photo from the Department of Defense’s website. Yes, that’s Otto the Bus Driver from The Simpsons. Here are some choice excerpts from his official bio: ...

607573_otto5.jpg
607573_otto5.jpg

Did you know that we have cartoon characters working for the military? We mean that literally (although it's perhaps figuratively true too). Neither did we, until we stumbled across this photo from the Department of Defense's website. Yes, that's Otto the Bus Driver from The Simpsons. Here are some choice excerpts from his official bio:

Though frequently involved in random collisions, Otto remains true the Bus Driver's Pledge: "never crash the bus on purpose," and stands proudly by his record of fifteen crashes without a single fatality. 

And here, we see that he comes from a military family:

Did you know that we have cartoon characters working for the military? We mean that literally (although it’s perhaps figuratively true too). Neither did we, until we stumbled across this photo from the Department of Defense’s website. Yes, that’s Otto the Bus Driver from The Simpsons. Here are some choice excerpts from his official bio:

Though frequently involved in random collisions, Otto remains true the Bus Driver’s Pledge: “never crash the bus on purpose,” and stands proudly by his record of fifteen crashes without a single fatality. 

And here, we see that he comes from a military family:

Otto has trouble with authority, beginning with his father, “the Admiral,” and continuing to this day. Otto doesn’t flout authority so much as unwittingly bump into it, which results in his feeling constantly hassled by “the man.”

Dude, that rocks, man!

(Yeah, yeah, we know that the snapshot was probably put up by some mischievous webmaster at the Pentagon, having a little fun while updating their site. So don’t inundate FP with emails about this. Although, seriously, how apropos that Otto is there. All they’re missing now is Krusty the Clown!)

Christine Y. Chen is a senior editor at Foreign Policy.

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