Morning Brief, Wednesday, September 6

Mexican elections Felipe Calderon is named president-elect by the main electoral tribunal in Mexico, but his opponent Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, who lost by less than 1 percent, vows to continue his campaign of civil disobedience and refuses to recognize the results. So how to negotiate out of the ensuing social and political mess? Some ...

607243_Calderon5.jpg
607243_Calderon5.jpg

Mexican elections

Felipe Calderon is named president-elect by the main electoral tribunal in Mexico, but his opponent Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, who lost by less than 1 percent, vows to continue his campaign of civil disobedience and refuses to recognize the results. So how to negotiate out of the ensuing social and political mess? Some believe Calderon should seek reconciliation by adopting some of his leftist rival's platform points.

Iraq

Mexican elections

Felipe Calderon is named president-elect by the main electoral tribunal in Mexico, but his opponent Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, who lost by less than 1 percent, vows to continue his campaign of civil disobedience and refuses to recognize the results. So how to negotiate out of the ensuing social and political mess? Some believe Calderon should seek reconciliation by adopting some of his leftist rival’s platform points.

Iraq

Having the name Omar or Ali in Iraq can kill you. The sectarian fighting continues to drive Iraqis to change their names in order to protect them from death squads. 

And in a must-read, Ali Fadhil, an Iraqi journalist, warns of the worsening environment for press in his country. 

Nuclear crises

Talks between Iran and the EU over Tehran’s nuclear program have been postponed for several days. And the parallel with Iraq four years ago isn’t going unnoticed.

In an op-ed in the Washington Post, Don Oberdorfer (who spoke recently with FP about missile tests and Kim Jong Il’s questionable sanity) and Donald Gregg argue that sanctions against North Korea won’t weaken the regime or bring them to the table – but could drive Kim to test a nuke.

Elsewhere

Japan’s Princess Kiko gives birth to a baby boy, possibly ending the succession debate over the Chrysanthemum Throne. 

China swears it will allow foreign journalists free reign during the 2008 Olympics in Beijing, though Wen Jiabao announces that the country is not intent on adopting democratic reforms anytime soon. 

Will the next British election be fought over globalization, with the left its champion and the right using it as a convenient punching bag?

Carolyn O'Hara is a senior editor at Foreign Policy.

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