FP remembers

Be sure to head over to ForeignPolicy.com today. We’ve devoted the homepage to some of FP‘s best analysis on the attacks of September 11 and the war on terror. Several of the articles come from our current issue, led by our cover story, “The Day Nothing Much Changed” by FP‘s managing editor, Will Dobson. Kim ...

607171_SepOctCover5.jpg
607171_SepOctCover5.jpg

Be sure to head over to
ForeignPolicy.com
today. We've devoted the homepage to some of FP's best analysis on the attacks of September 11 and the war on terror. Several of the articles come from our current issue, led by our cover story, "The Day Nothing Much Changed" by FP's managing editor, Will Dobson. Kim Cragin and Andrew Curiel of RAND chart the shocking rise in terror attacks around the world in our most recent Prime Numbers, and Juan Cole debunks myths about 9/11. We also have Anne Applebaum searching for America's admirers, Benjamin Friedman on why everything you know about homeland security is probably false, Kenneth Rogoff on whether the global economy can survive the costs of security, and Christine Fair and Hussain Haqqani on the popular misconceptions of what inspires Islamist terrorism. As we remember that day five years ago - where we were, what we saw, who we lost - it's crucial to challenge the easy conclusions about what it all meant and where we go from here. I think these pieces do just that. See for yourself.

Be sure to head over to
ForeignPolicy.com
today. We’ve devoted the homepage to some of FP‘s best analysis on the attacks of September 11 and the war on terror. Several of the articles come from our current issue, led by our cover story, “The Day Nothing Much Changed” by FP‘s managing editor, Will Dobson. Kim Cragin and Andrew Curiel of RAND chart the shocking rise in terror attacks around the world in our most recent Prime Numbers, and Juan Cole debunks myths about 9/11. We also have Anne Applebaum searching for America’s admirers, Benjamin Friedman on why everything you know about homeland security is probably false, Kenneth Rogoff on whether the global economy can survive the costs of security, and Christine Fair and Hussain Haqqani on the popular misconceptions of what inspires Islamist terrorism. As we remember that day five years ago – where we were, what we saw, who we lost – it’s crucial to challenge the easy conclusions about what it all meant and where we go from here. I think these pieces do just that. See for yourself.

Carolyn O'Hara is a senior editor at Foreign Policy.

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