Morning Brief, Friday, September 29

The detainee bill passes The U.S. Senate passed a bill 65-34 last night (here's the roll call) on the interrogation and trial of terror suspects. It strips suspects of habeas corpus and other rights and provides the president with the discretion to determine the legality of certain techniques. It may not be the final word ...

The detainee bill passes

The detainee bill passes

The U.S. Senate passed a bill 65-34 last night (here's the roll call) on the interrogation and trial of terror suspects. It strips suspects of habeas corpus and other rights and provides the president with the discretion to determine the legality of certain techniques. It may not be the final word however:

Even some Republicans who voted for the bill said they expected the Supreme Court to strike down the legislation because of the provision barring court detainees’ challenges…"

United Nations

Top U.N. officials urge the U.S. and others to drop their insistence that Sudan accept U.N. peacekeepers in Darfur, arguing for a stronger African Union force instead. 

The race to succeed Kofi Annan has a frontrunner. Is it because his country has been doling out incentives to Security Council countries? The dirty secret at the U.N. is just how much those Security Council seats are worth to developing countries.

Elsewhere

Taliban attacks have doubled along Afghanistan's southeastern border since Pakistan signed a deal with militants there. Robert Pollack is in the WSJ today arguing why Musharraf shouldn't be America's favorite dictator.

Bush looks the other way with Kazakhstan, mulls arms sales to corrupt regime. 

The Thai military council responsible for last week's coup lines up a fellow (former) general for the interim prime minister spot. In this week's Seven Questions for ForeignPolicy.com, John Brandon of the Asia Foundation explains why such a choice sends a bad message to the rest of the world.

Georgia-Russia relations sour over a spying allegation. A relative of the new judge in the Saddam trial is murdered. It's apparently anyone's race in Zambia. And the collapse of the Doha round may mean that the subsidy train keeps rolling for American farmers.

Carolyn O'Hara is a senior editor at Foreign Policy.

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