Woodward scooped…again

I can only imagine that there is a cold chill in the air over at the WaPo newsroom this afternoon. After being scooped once again on a story about one of its own scribes, the Post is scrambling to catch up with the New York Times, which this morning outed the most important revelations of Bob Woodward’s new ...

606879_woodward.thumbnail5.jpg
606879_woodward.thumbnail5.jpg

I can only imagine that there is a cold chill in the air over at the WaPo newsroom this afternoon. After being scooped once again on a story about one of its own scribes, the Post is scrambling to catch up with the New York Times, which this morning outed the most important revelations of Bob Woodward's new book, State of Denial.

Based on my reading of the Times piece, Woodward appears to have taken to heart criticisms that he previously took a light hand on Bush in exchange for unfettered access to top administration aides. But his new, critical approach raises the question of whether this book will really provide any new insights into the administration's thinking on Iraq, or whether it will be just another in the endless stream of Bush-bashing tomes churned out over the past few years. Unless Woodward gets scooped again, we'll have to wait until Monday to find out.

I can only imagine that there is a cold chill in the air over at the WaPo newsroom this afternoon. After being scooped once again on a story about one of its own scribes, the Post is scrambling to catch up with the New York Times, which this morning outed the most important revelations of Bob Woodward’s new book, State of Denial.

Based on my reading of the Times piece, Woodward appears to have taken to heart criticisms that he previously took a light hand on Bush in exchange for unfettered access to top administration aides. But his new, critical approach raises the question of whether this book will really provide any new insights into the administration’s thinking on Iraq, or whether it will be just another in the endless stream of Bush-bashing tomes churned out over the past few years. Unless Woodward gets scooped again, we’ll have to wait until Monday to find out.

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