Mosquitoes vs. cigarettes

British American Tobacco is spearheading a 52-company corporate drive in Uganda to counter the country’s anti-malaria campaign. BAT, which produces Kent, Dunhill and Lucky Strike cigarettes, argues that without proper controls, the Ugandan government’s plan to use a weak DDT-based solution to spray houses could also damage agricultural crops (including, of course, tobacco), costing up to $400 million ...

603609_mosquito25.jpg
603609_mosquito25.jpg

British American Tobacco is spearheading a 52-company corporate drive in Uganda to counter the country’s anti-malaria campaign. BAT, which produces Kent, Dunhill and Lucky Strike cigarettes, argues that without proper controls, the Ugandan government's plan to use a weak DDT-based solution to spray houses could also damage agricultural crops (including, of course, tobacco), costing up to $400 million in exports and 600,000 jobs. Anti-malaria groups are up in arms, arguing that DDT spraying programs have not hurt exports in other countries, including South Africa, Zambia, and Madagascar. 

Malaria kills more than 1 million people a year, according to the WHO, which supports the use of DDT to fight the disease. Tobacco related products kill nearly 5 million.  The makers of a lethal product fighting malaria prevention measures in Africa?  Le Carré couldn’t have written it any better.

British American Tobacco is spearheading a 52-company corporate drive in Uganda to counter the country’s anti-malaria campaign. BAT, which produces Kent, Dunhill and Lucky Strike cigarettes, argues that without proper controls, the Ugandan government’s plan to use a weak DDT-based solution to spray houses could also damage agricultural crops (including, of course, tobacco), costing up to $400 million in exports and 600,000 jobs. Anti-malaria groups are up in arms, arguing that DDT spraying programs have not hurt exports in other countries, including South Africa, Zambia, and Madagascar. 

Malaria kills more than 1 million people a year, according to the WHO, which supports the use of DDT to fight the disease. Tobacco related products kill nearly 5 million.  The makers of a lethal product fighting malaria prevention measures in Africa?  Le Carré couldn’t have written it any better.

More from Foreign Policy

A propaganda poster from the 1960s shows Chinese leader Mao Zedong.
A propaganda poster from the 1960s shows Chinese leader Mao Zedong.

Xi’s Great Leap Backward

Beijing is running out of recipes for its looming jobs crisis—and reviving Mao-era policies.

A textile worker at the Maxport factory in Hanoi on Sept. 21, 2021.
A textile worker at the Maxport factory in Hanoi on Sept. 21, 2021.

Companies Are Fleeing China for Friendlier Shores

“Friendshoring” is the new trend as geopolitics bites.

German children stand atop building rubble in Berlin in 1948.
German children stand atop building rubble in Berlin in 1948.

Why Superpower Crises Are a Good Thing

A new era of tensions will focus minds and break logjams, as Cold War history shows.

Vacationers sit on a beach in Greece.
Vacationers sit on a beach in Greece.

The Mediterranean as We Know It Is Vanishing

From Saint-Tropez to Amalfi, the region’s most attractive tourist destinations are also its most vulnerable.