Newsweek does it again

Yes, once again, Newsweek‘s international editions has chosen a serious threat to the world to splash on its covers: global warming. What do Americans get on newsstands at home? A sex scandal!  Full disclosure and half-hearted defense: I used to work for Newsweek (for the international editions, mind you), and I do know that there ...

606678_newsweekcovers5.jpg
606678_newsweekcovers5.jpg

Yes, once again, Newsweek's international editions has chosen a serious threat to the world to splash on its covers: global warming. What do Americans get on newsstands at home? A sex scandal! 

Full disclosure and half-hearted defense: I used to work for Newsweek (for the international editions, mind you), and I do know that there are totally valid and legitimate reasons why the magazine's editors choose the covers they do. Congressman harasses pages? Sure, it's important national news, especially given the political ramifications for next month's Congressional elections. Moreover, what's going to sell more copies of the magazine? A little bitty frog? Or SEX?! Still, the brouhaha surrounding the whole Foley scandal just appeals to the lowest common denominator. And I'm not sure if that's a statement about Newsweek, or about America. Or maybe both.

Hat tip: Wonkette

Yes, once again, Newsweek‘s international editions has chosen a serious threat to the world to splash on its covers: global warming. What do Americans get on newsstands at home? A sex scandal! 

Full disclosure and half-hearted defense: I used to work for Newsweek (for the international editions, mind you), and I do know that there are totally valid and legitimate reasons why the magazine’s editors choose the covers they do. Congressman harasses pages? Sure, it’s important national news, especially given the political ramifications for next month’s Congressional elections. Moreover, what’s going to sell more copies of the magazine? A little bitty frog? Or SEX?! Still, the brouhaha surrounding the whole Foley scandal just appeals to the lowest common denominator. And I’m not sure if that’s a statement about Newsweek, or about America. Or maybe both.

Hat tip: Wonkette

Christine Y. Chen is a senior editor at Foreign Policy.
Tag: Media

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