China to equal U.S. in 10 years?

Chinese officials claim they have no desire to be the most powerful in the world. But what about the people? A study by the Chicago Council on Global Affairs has revealed that Chinese see themselves as becoming as powerful as the U.S. within ten years. The multi-nation study, which was released earlier this week, polled ...

606670_ChinaFlag5.gif
606670_ChinaFlag5.gif

Chinese officials claim they have no desire to be the most powerful in the world. But what about the people? A study by the Chicago Council on Global Affairs has revealed that Chinese see themselves as becoming as powerful as the U.S. within ten years. The multi-nation study, which was released earlier this week, polled people in China, India, and the U.S. this summer to gage public opinion about the emergence of Asian dynamos, the role of the U.S., and perceptions of global challenges.

Some 55 percent of Americans believe the U.S. will be equaled or surpassed as the world's most powerful country sometime in the next 50 years, a view shared by 68 percent of South Koreans, 53 percent of Indians and 60 percent of Chinese. Only 29 percent of Americans said the US should work actively to limit the growth of China's power. And despite frustration over Iraq, most Americans remain committed to steady internationalism, as opposed to protectionism or isolationism. Surprisingly, spreading democracy abroad came last on a list of foreign policy goals for Americans, while protecting jobs was ranked first.

The landmark study also found that only 35 percent of Chinese and 39 percent of Indians trusted the U.S. to act responsibly in the world. Ranking what they saw as critical threats to their interests, the Chinese first listed AIDS, avian flu, and other potential epidemics, followed by disruption in energy supplies and global warming. Instability or conflict on the Korean peninsula was ranked ninth (although that might have changed with this week's developments). Both China and India claimed their country as second behind the U.S. in global influence.

Chinese officials claim they have no desire to be the most powerful in the world. But what about the people? A study by the Chicago Council on Global Affairs has revealed that Chinese see themselves as becoming as powerful as the U.S. within ten years. The multi-nation study, which was released earlier this week, polled people in China, India, and the U.S. this summer to gage public opinion about the emergence of Asian dynamos, the role of the U.S., and perceptions of global challenges.

Some 55 percent of Americans believe the U.S. will be

equaled or surpassed as the world’s most powerful country sometime in the next 50 years, a view shared by 68 percent of South Koreans, 53 percent of Indians and 60 percent of Chinese. Only 29 percent of Americans said the US should work actively to limit the growth of China’s power. And despite frustration over Iraq, most Americans remain committed to steady internationalism, as opposed to protectionism or isolationism. Surprisingly, spreading democracy abroad came last on a list of foreign policy goals for Americans, while protecting jobs was ranked first.

The landmark study also found that only 35 percent of Chinese and 39 percent of Indians trusted the U.S. to act responsibly in the world. Ranking what they saw as critical threats to their interests, the Chinese first listed AIDS, avian flu, and other potential epidemics, followed by disruption in energy supplies and global warming. Instability or conflict on the Korean peninsula was ranked ninth (although that might have changed with this week’s developments). Both China and India claimed their country as second behind the U.S. in global influence.

Check out the main findings here.

 

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