Morning Brief, Friday, October 13, 2006

Euro-news British army chief General Richard Dannatt has provoked a tempest by saying that he thinks British troops should come home from Iraq within the next two years. Three senior officials to President Joseph Kabila of the Democratic Republic of Congo, including his chief of staff, were beaten in London yesterday.The EU and India move ...

Euro-news

British army chief General Richard Dannatt has provoked a tempest by saying that he thinks British troops should come home from Iraq within the next two years. Three senior officials to President Joseph Kabila of the Democratic Republic of Congo, including his chief of staff, were beaten in London yesterday.The EU and India move forward on a trade deal. Here it comes to save the day - scientists have discovered a new mammal species in Cyprus: mighty mouse. It's the first new terrestrial mammal to be discovered in Europe in decades.

Related to religion

Euro-news

British army chief General Richard Dannatt has provoked a tempest by saying that he thinks British troops should come home from Iraq within the next two years. Three senior officials to President Joseph Kabila of the Democratic Republic of Congo, including his chief of staff, were beaten in London yesterday.The EU and India move forward on a trade deal. Here it comes to save the day – scientists have discovered a new mammal species in Cyprus: mighty mouse. It's the first new terrestrial mammal to be discovered in Europe in decades.

Related to religion

Four more Palestinians were killed in fresh Israeli strikes in the Gaza Strip. Former Harvard professor and human rights scholar Michael Ignatieff, who is running for the leadership of Canada's Liberal Party, has created a controversy by calling Israel's July bombing of the southern town of Qana, Lebanon as a "war crime." Sixteen Afghanis and one Iraq who had been detained in Guantanamo for four years were released and returned to Afghanistan. The pope is drafting a proposal for the more frequent use of the Tridentine Mass, which is in Latin. It was largely replaced by masses in more modern languages during the Second Vatican Council of the 1960s. China has admitted that border guards shot and killed a nun who was crossing over from Tibet into Nepal.  

Elsewhere

Economist Muhammad Yunus of Bangladesh and the Grameen Bank have won the Nobel Peace Prize for 2006 for pioneering microcredit as a way to stimulate the local economy in impoverished areas. China plans on adopting a law that will crack down on sweatshop labor and give more power to unions.  Large foreign corporations are lobbying against it, saying that it may force them to locate their factories elsewhere.

The latest draft of a U.N. proposal for sanctions against North Korea make it clear that there will be no military retribution, and that an arms embargo would be against heavy weaponry only. A second attempt to recall Taiwanese President Chen Shui-bian has failed. Kazhakstan is investing heavily in its capital city of Astana to make it more futuristic-looking, no doubt in anticipation of impressing foreign investors in search of oil. Would Borat approve?

Next week, the population of the U.S. will reach 300 million

Christine Y. Chen is a senior editor at Foreign Policy.

More from Foreign Policy

An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.
An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.

Is Cold War Inevitable?

A new biography of George Kennan, the father of containment, raises questions about whether the old Cold War—and the emerging one with China—could have been avoided.

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.
U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.

So You Want to Buy an Ambassadorship

The United States is the only Western government that routinely rewards mega-donors with top diplomatic posts.

Chinese President Xi jinping  toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.
Chinese President Xi jinping toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.

Can China Pull Off Its Charm Offensive?

Why Beijing’s foreign-policy reset will—or won’t—work out.

Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.
Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.

Turkey’s Problem Isn’t Sweden. It’s the United States.

Erdogan has focused on Stockholm’s stance toward Kurdish exile groups, but Ankara’s real demand is the end of U.S. support for Kurds in Syria.