What will change if the Dems win?

It’s now two weeks and counting until the U.S. midterm elections. And depending on whom you choose to believe, it’s either the biggest election in recent memory or no big deal. What it might just be is a huge snafu. A report out today from the Election Reform Information Project predicts that polls across the ...

606542_capitol_15.jpg
606542_capitol_15.jpg

It's now two weeks and counting until the U.S. midterm elections. And depending on whom you choose to believe, it's either the biggest election in recent memory or no big deal. What it might just be is a huge snafu. A report out today from the Election Reform Information Project predicts that polls across the country will be marred by technical problems from unproven new voting machines, confusion over stricter ID requirements and new poll locations, and troubles from inconsistent registration procedures. So whether Dems take the House, Senate, or both, there may be more than a few questionable results.

But just what will change in the realm of U.S. foreign policy if the Dems win? To find out, FP recently asked more than a dozen Washington insiders, ex-politicians, and pundits to speculate on U.S. foreign policy under a Dem-led Congress. Their answers will surprise you - they range from Rumsfeld's swift exit to more bipartisan cooperation to no change at all. Still, while a Democratic sweep may be racking up more and more believers, there are still 14 days to go. And with some candidates getting their names chopped off by faulty voter machines - a problem that can't be fixed before November 7 - there's reason to believe that this election is going to deliver more than its fair share of surprises.

And bonus: Don't miss the Post's Midterm Madness interactive game.

It’s now two weeks and counting until the U.S. midterm elections. And depending on whom you choose to believe, it’s either the biggest election in recent memory or no big deal. What it might just be is a huge snafu. A report out today from the Election Reform Information Project predicts that polls across the country will be marred by technical problems from unproven new voting machines, confusion over stricter ID requirements and new poll locations, and troubles from inconsistent registration procedures. So whether Dems take the House, Senate, or both, there may be more than a few questionable results.

But just what will change in the realm of U.S. foreign policy if the Dems win? To find out, FP recently asked more than a dozen Washington insiders, ex-politicians, and pundits to speculate on U.S. foreign policy under a Dem-led Congress. Their answers will surprise you – they range from Rumsfeld’s swift exit to more bipartisan cooperation to no change at all. Still, while a Democratic sweep may be racking up more and more believers, there are still 14 days to go. And with some candidates getting their names chopped off by faulty voter machines – a problem that can’t be fixed before November 7 – there’s reason to believe that this election is going to deliver more than its fair share of surprises.

And bonus: Don’t miss the Post‘s Midterm Madness interactive game.

Carolyn O'Hara is a senior editor at Foreign Policy.

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