Morning Brief, Tuesday, October 31

North Korea back at the table Pyongyang agrees to return to six-party talks over its nuclear program, fueling hopes that Kim’s nuclear program could still be dismantled. The U.S. negotiator, Christopher Hill, warns Pyongyang against conducting a second nuclear test. The talks could resume as early as November. Iraq Nearly 50 Iraqis were killed in ...

606425_ChrisHill5.jpg
606425_ChrisHill5.jpg

North Korea back at the table

Pyongyang agrees to return to six-party talks over its nuclear program, fueling hopes that Kim's nuclear program could still be dismantled. The U.S. negotiator, Christopher Hill, warns Pyongyang against conducting a second nuclear test. The talks could resume as early as November.

Iraq

North Korea back at the table

Pyongyang agrees to return to six-party talks over its nuclear program, fueling hopes that Kim’s nuclear program could still be dismantled. The U.S. negotiator, Christopher Hill, warns Pyongyang against conducting a second nuclear test. The talks could resume as early as November.

Iraq

Nearly 50 Iraqis were killed in Baghdad yesterday as bombs exploded across the capital and the American death toll rose to 102. Dick Cheney blames the increase in violence on insurgents hoping to influence the midterms

PM Maliki begins what may be a major showdown with the U.S. when he ordered the lifting of a blockade of Sadr City today, a siege American and Iraqi forces put in place several days ago during their search for a missing American soldier and an alleged death squad leader, both believed to be in Sadr City. 

In Britain, Tony Blair is trying to quell calls in the Commons for an inquiry into the handling of the Iraq war.

Elsewhere

Turkey’s bid to join the EU will take a hit next week when an official report is released charging Ankara with failing to make significant progress on reforms. 

Tribesman protest in Pakistan after a madrassa was destroyed yesterday and as many as 80 were killed. Pakistani officials deny that the U.S. was involved, though there’s speculation that the attack was targeting Al Qaeda’s #2. 

The siege of Oaxaca continues. A women’s rights group claims life hasn’t changed for Afghanistan’s women since the fall of the Taliban. Britain will push for an international climate change deal by 2008. Serbians vote to retain Kosovo. And residents in western Germany get an unwanted Halloween surprise: Two tons of severed pig heads on the road.

Carolyn O'Hara is a senior editor at Foreign Policy.

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